An Iranian woman shops at a supermarket in the capital, Tehran, on Feb. 22. International sanctions have hurt Iran's economy, but prospects for a breakthrough on Iran's nuclear program are dim as negotiators meet in Kazakhstan. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Sanctions Bite, But Iran Shows No Signs Of Budging

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Some companies, frustrated with intrusions into their networks by cyberattackers, are now trying to turn the tables in the ongoing and complicated cyberwar. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Victims Of Cyberattacks Get Proactive Against Intruders

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An analyst looks at code in the malware lab of a cybersecurity defense lab at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho, Sept. 29, 2011. Jim Urquhart/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jim Urquhart/Reuters/Landov

In Cyberwar, Software Flaws Are A Hot Commodity

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Homeland Security analysts watch for threats to U.S. technological infrastructure at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Pentagon Goes On The Offensive Against Cyberattacks

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Brennan Objects To Use Of Waterboarding In CIA Confirmation Hearing

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John Brennan, the deputy national security adviser for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, speaks at the White House in January. Brennan is President Obama's choice for CIA director. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Obama's Pick For CIA Chief To Face Senate Scrutiny

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Egyptian President Anwar Sadat is flanked by senior military officers as he reviews maps of battlefield developments in the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. He's shown at army headquarters in Cairo on Oct. 15, 1973. Egypt and Syria attacked Israel, catching Israel and the CIA off-guard. AP hide caption

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AP

The CIA And The Hazards Of Middle East Forecasting

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Pentagon To Dramatically Expand 'Cyber Warrior' Force

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Militants attacked Algeria's In Amenas gas field last week. Thirty-seven foreigners, including three Americans, were killed in the subsequent raid by Algerian security forces. BP/AP hide caption

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BP/AP

Algeria Attack A 'Wake-Up Call' For Energy Companies

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A photo from Aug. 15, 2012, supplied by the Institute for Science and International Security, shows buildings at the Parchin military base south of Tehran, Iran, shrouded in pink tarps. It's believed to be an effort to stop the U.N nuclear agency from monitoring the site, which is suspected of being used for secret work on atomic weapons. ISIS/AP hide caption

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ISIS/AP

U.S., Iran Running Low On Options Over Nuclear Program

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Iranian Government May Be Behind Recent Cyber Attacks

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John Brennan speaks in the East Room of the White House on Monday, after President Obama announced his nomination of Brennan to run the CIA. Obama also announced his choice of former Sen. Chuck Hagel (left) to head the Department of Defense. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

CIA Nominee Brennan Has Obama's 'Complete Trust'

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Policymakers Planning For A Venezuela After Chavez

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This monitor screen image shows a graphic of the orbit of the satellite carried by the Unha-3 rocket, which North Korea launched this week. The image is from the Korean Central News Agency, distributed in Tokyo by the Korea News Service. AP hide caption

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AP

What North Korea's Rocket Launch Tells Us About Iran's Role

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The National Intelligence Council's Global Trends 2030 report predicts that by the year 2030, a majority of the world's population will be out of poverty. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The World In 2030: Asia Rises, The West Declines

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