Pentagon Slams Leak Of Afghan War Reports

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Workboats operate near the Transocean Development Drilling Rig II at the site of the Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this month. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Oil Industry Rethinks Cost, Risk Of Drilling In U.S.

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U.S. Marines lead an Afghan detainee toward their combat outpost for questioning in a Taliban stronghold area in Marjah, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, April 1, 2010. The leak of more than 90,000 secret military intelligence reports on the war in Afghanistan paints a grim and often discouraging picture of the situation on the ground. Mauricio Lima/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Leaked Afghan Reports Do And Don't Tell Us

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Leaked Documents Offer Window Into Afghan War

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The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team/National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center is designed to help protect the technical infrastructure of the United States. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyberwarrior Shortage Threatens U.S. Security

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Last month Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Michael Mullen testified in Washington on the Defense Department's fiscal 2011 budget. He said recently that debt was one of the biggest threats to the United States. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Defense Officials Anticipate Drop In Military Spending

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Gen. William K. Harrison, Jr., seated at left, and North Korean Gen. Nam Il, seated at right, sign armistice documents in Armistice Hall in Panmunjom, a no man's land between the Koreas, on July 26, 1953. AP hide caption

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CIA Files Show U.S. Blindsided By Korean War

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Employee Sean Tippett works in an operations room at the headquarters of Cisco Systems, a leading provider of Internet network technology, in San Jose, Calif. Experts are debating the need for Internet traceability for security purposes -- and what that would mean for online anonymity and civil liberties in places such as China and Iran. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Does Averting Cyberwar Mean Giving Up Web Privacy?

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National Intelligence Job Comes With Turf Battles

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Defense Secretary Robert Gates delivers the oath of office to Gen. Keith Alexander (right) during the activation ceremony of U.S. Cyber Command at Fort Meade, Md., last month. Cherie Cullen/AP/Department of Defense hide caption

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U.S. Seeks To Define Rules On Cyberwar

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A North Korean soldier (left) and a South Korean soldier stand opposite each other at the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. Yonhap/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Motivations For North Korea's Actions A Mystery

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What Went Wrong In Spain But Why It Isn't Greece

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Director of National Intelligence Dennis Blair, seen here in February, offered his resignation Thursday. During the 16 months on the job, Blair struggled to establish his authority over the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Blair's Exit Raises Questions About Intelligence Job

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