Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

[+] read more[-] less

Customs and Border Protection agents stand at the San Ysidro Port of Entry on Friday, Feb. 10. One memorandum issued by the Department of Homeland Security says the government will hire new ICE officers and Border Patrol agents, but it doesn't mention hiring more immigration judges. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

Overwhelmed Courts Could Limit Impact Of Adding Immigration Officers

Audio will be available later today.

Memos signed by Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly, seen at a news conference earlier this month at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego, lay out a number of immigration-enforcement measures, such as expedited deportation proceedings for unauthorized immigrants who have been in the U.S. illegally for up to two years. Denis Poroy/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Denis Poroy/AP

Residents Near Oroville Dam Brace For Storms After Returning Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515441657/515441660" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Officials Were Warned That Dam's Spillway Could Fail, Reports Show

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515138456/515138457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nearly 200,000 People Evacuate Near Oroville Dam In California

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515043633/515043634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Immigration Authorities Launch Raids Across The Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514650946/514650947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent detains an immigrant in 2015 in Los Angeles. A new round of detentions this week has triggered complaints from immigrant advocates. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Immigration Raids Are Reported Around The Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514610542/514683104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Immigrant rights advocates protest then-President-elect Donald Trump's immigration policies last month. A new study shows that more than 60 percent of the people in this country illegally are concentrated in 20 metro areas. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

A sign at Washington Dulles International Airport welcomes travelers. A three-judge panel decided not to reinstate President Trump's travel ban barring travelers from seven majority-Muslim nations. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

On Tuesday, arguments related to President Trump's temporary travel ban will be presented by phone to a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and live-streamed at the James R. Browning U.S. Court of Appeals building in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Former detainee Omar al-Shogre before his arrest and shortly after his release from Saydnaya Military Prison in Syria. Courtesy of Amnesty International hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Amnesty International

Amnesty International Reports Organized Murder Of Detainees In Syrian Prison

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513804240/513888783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Boy Scout listens to instruction at Camp Maple Dell in Utah. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Frey/Getty Images

Boy Scouts Will Admit Transgender Boys

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512541372/512592802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript