Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn speaking at the White House in February. He's been subpoenaed by a Senate committee investigating possible Trump campaign dealings with Russia. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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After Ann Coulter Backs Out Of Visit, UC Berkeley Braces For Free Speech Rallies

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Protester Moina Shaiq holds a sign at a rally outside City Hall in San Francisco. On Tuesday, a federal judge blocked a Trump administration order to withhold funding from sanctuary communities. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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ICE agents conduct an enforcement operation in Los Angeles in February. Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP hide caption

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Protesters gather outside the state Capitol building in Little Rock, Ark., on Friday to voice their opposition to the executions that were scheduled for the next two weeks. On Friday and Saturday, two judges blocked the executions from moving forward; the state is appealing. Kelly P. Kissel/AP hide caption

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There are signs that fewer immigrants in the U.S. illegally are filing taxes than in previous years. Ronnie Kaufman/Getty Images hide caption

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Tax Filings Seen Dipping Amid Trump Crackdown On Illegal Immigration

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