Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a Jan. 11 news conference, in which he acknowledged that Russia hacked Democratic campaign communications. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd in Birmingham, Ala., in 1966. President Obama has designated an historic civil rights district in Birmingham as a national monument. JT/AP hide caption

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Cuban refugees float in heavy seas 60 miles south of Key West, Fla., in 1994. The Obama administration is ending a two-decades-old policy of allowing Cuban refugees to stay in the U.S. if they can make it to U.S. soil. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca leaves federal court in Los Angeles, near the end of his December 2016 trial of charges of obstruction and conspiracy. A mis-trial was declared. Baca will be retried. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Former Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June 2012. Holder, now in private practice, has signed on to represent the California Legislature as outside legal counsel. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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San Francisco Braces For Crackdown Over Immigration Policies

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Investigators Continue Recovery Efforts From Oakland Warehouse Fire

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The Death Toll In Oakland's Deadliest Fire Stands At 33

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Former NPR foreign correspondent Alan Tomlinson with WLRN TV Executive Producer Adrienne Kennedy. Tomlinson died Nov. 26 in Miami at the age of 69. Roberto Valladares/WLRN hide caption

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Alan Tomlinson Reports From Haiti

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Efrain Antonio Campo Flores, seated second from left, and his cousin Franqui Francisco Flores De Freitas, far right, were convicted by a federal jury in Manhattan of conspiracy to smuggle cocaine into the U.S. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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