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Tuning In To The Brain's 'Cocktail Party Effect'

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Songbirds, like this male tricolored blackbird, develop regional accents in the same way humans do, researchers found. And, like humans, songbirds seem to respond better to accents they already know. Dave Menke/Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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Unfamiliar Accents Turn Off Humans And Songbirds

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The locals of Beatty, Nev., brought back the Amargosa toad from near extinction and kept the species off the endangered species list. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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All Hopped Up: Town Unites For Toad Revival

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved Nuedexta to treat a condition known as emotional incontinence. Courtesy of Avanir hide caption

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New Drug Approved For Emotional Incontinence

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A clinical psychologist in Connecticut monitors the electrode impulses of a patient with ADHD. Some parents are turning to neurofeedback to treat the disorder. Catherine Avalone/The Middletown Press hide caption

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Train The Brain: Using Neurofeedback To Treat ADHD

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Children await treatment at a medical facility in St. Marc, northern Haiti, amid a cholera epidemic that has claimed more than 100 lives and infected more than 1,000 people over the past few days. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Officials Race To Contain Cholera Outbreak In Haiti

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Scientists exposed the brains of specially engineered lab mice to pulses of light and saw brain cells responding as if they were triggered by an odor. The research could be applied to diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Eric Isselee/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sensory Deception: Lab Mice Can 'Smell' Light

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Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center via Technology Review

Football's Brain Injury Lessons Head To Battlefield

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Scientists found that neurons (red) are able to leak signaling chemicals to nearby cells. The finding may help explain the cause of some nervous system conditions, including epilepsy and chronic pain. Institute for Stem Cell Research/Getty Images hide caption

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Twitchy Nerves (Literally) May Explain Epilepsy, Pain

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Nobel Prize For Medicine Goes To IVF Pioneer

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