A light micrograph image of telomeres, shown in yellow, at the end of human chromosomes. Women tend to have longer telomeres than men and tend to outlive men, according to new research matching genetic information with medical records. Peter Lansdorp/Visuals Unlimited/Corbis hide caption

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Matching DNA With Medical Records To Crack Disease And Aging

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The Beatles rehearse for that night's Royal Variety Performance at the Prince of Wales Theatre in 1963. Central/Hulton Achive/Getty Images hide caption

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The Beatles' Surprising Contribution To Brain Science

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Residents of the Colonial Place neighborhood watch as heavy rain from Hurricane Sandy floods the Lafayette River in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 28. Rich-Joseph Facun/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Protection From The Sea Is Possible, But Expensive

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Motorists drive through standing water at an intersection flooded from the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida in the Ocean View area of Norfolk, Va., in November 2009. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Norfolk, Va., Puts Flooding Survival Plan To The Test

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These computer models from Oct. 26 of then-Hurricane Sandy show different predictions for the storm's path. NOAA hide caption

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High-Def Storm Models Yielded Accurate Predictions

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A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

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In this satellite image provided Friday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hurricane Sandy's huge cloud extent of up to 2,000 miles churns over the Bahamas, as a line of clouds associated with a powerful cold front approaches the East Coast of the U.S. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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A school of manini fish passes over a coral reef at Hanauma Bay in 2005, in Honolulu. Researchers say schooling behavior like the kind seen in fish helps groups of animals make better decisions than any one member of the group could. Donald Miralle/Getty Images hide caption

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In Animal Kingdom, Voting Of A Different Sort Reigns

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Research Highlights Strengths Of Adolescent Brain

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Treatment For Alzheimer's Should Start Years Before Disease Sets In

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A rat neuron before (top) and after (bottom) ketamine treatment. The increased number of orange nodes are restored connections in the rat's brain. Ronald Duman/Yale University hide caption

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Ketamine Relieves Depression By Restoring Brain Connections

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Sam Berns, 15, who has the very rare premature-aging disease progeria, plays the drums in his high school's marching band. Courtesy of the Progeria Research Foundation hide caption

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Experimental Drug Is First To Help Kids With Premature-Aging Disease

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Andy Tranfaglia, 23, who has Fragile X syndrome, rides a horse with his mother, Katie Clapp. Katie Clapp hide caption

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Progress Made On Drug For Autism Symptoms

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