A newly discovered neural circuit in the brain of the common fruit fly seems to serve as a sort of "volume control," turning up and down the perception of sound and light. Nicholas Monu/iStockphoto hide caption

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Nicholas Monu/iStockphoto

Can A Fruit Fly Help Explain Autism?

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A technique called optogenetics is being used in the laboratory to observe and control what brain circuits are doing in real time. Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

Experimental Tool Uses Light To Tweak The Living Brain

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There's data to support the notion that pot, or a drug based on its active ingredient, could help ease the fears of PTSD. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Could Pot Help Veterans With PTSD? Brain Scientists Say Maybe

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'Forecast Bust:' Why 2013 Hurricane Predictions Were So Wrong

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Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

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In Pregnancy, What's Worse? Cigarettes Or The Nicotine Patch?

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President Obama has pledged millions of dollars to fuel research into understanding the workings of the human brain. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Federal Brain Science Project Aims To Restore Soldiers' Memory

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When researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College scanned teenage brains, they found that the area that regulates emotional responses has to work harder to keep impulses in check. Courtesty Kristina Caudle/Developmental Neuroscience hide caption

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Courtesty Kristina Caudle/Developmental Neuroscience

The Case Against Brain Scans As Evidence In Court

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Girls are particularly vulnerable to brain changes caused by stress or trauma, researchers say. Allen Johnson/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Childhood Maltreatment Can Leave Scars In The Brain

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Eeek, Snake! Your Brain Has A Special Corner Just For Them

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

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Bob Adams is a lab animal veterinarian at Johns Hopkins University. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Shutdown Imperils Costly Lab Mice, Years Of Research

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Scientists have discovered four new DEET-like mosquito repellents. Three of them are safe to eat. Courtesy of Pinky Kai/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Pinky Kai/University of California, Riverside

A DEET-Like Mosquito Spray That Smells Like Jasmine Or Grapes?

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Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio/NASA

Wild Weather Tied To Unusual Jet Stream Activity

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