Despite public health campaigns urging women in the U.S. to take folic acid, many are still not taking the supplements when they become pregnant. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com
Folic Acid For Pregnant Mothers Cuts Kids' Autism Risk
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171828067/171842617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jonathan Mitchell is autistic and wants to donate his brain to science when he dies. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR
Shortage Of Brain Tissue Hinders Autism Research
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/170835708/171039667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

State Senator Jeff Klein (L-R), Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy and Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins congratulate New York Governor Andrew Cuomo after he signed the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act on Tuesday. Hans Pennink/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Hans Pennink/Reuters/Landov
Mental Health Gun Laws Unlikely To Reduce Shootings
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169529792/169580456" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

If you know some mice that took This Is Spinal Tap too literally, they might want to know about an experiment to restore hearing with a failed Alzheimer's drug. The Kobal Collection hide caption

toggle caption The Kobal Collection
Alzheimer's Drug Dials Back Deafness In Mice
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168960377/168983947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This satellite image from Oct. 28 shows Hurricane Sandy in the Atlantic Ocean before making landfall. NASA via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption NASA via Getty Images
A Busy And Head-Scratching 2012 Hurricane Season
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168202352/168334763" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

toggle caption Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology
Despite Uneven Results, Alzheimer's Research Suggests A Path For Treatment
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168072345/168095851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A person's DNA can say a lot about a person, but not why someone has committed a horrific crime like mass murder. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com
Killer's DNA Won't Explain His Crime
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167785647/167824759" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A boy in Lima, Peru, receives a hepatitis B vaccine during an immunization drive in 2008. The United Nations is considering a ban on the preservative thimerosal, which is often used in hepatitis B and other vaccines in developing countries. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

toggle caption Martin Mejia/AP
Doctors Argue Against Proposed Ban On Vaccine Preservative
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167280941/167427965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A light micrograph image of telomeres, shown in yellow, at the end of human chromosomes. Women tend to have longer telomeres than men and tend to outlive men, according to new research matching genetic information with medical records. Peter Lansdorp/Visuals Unlimited/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Peter Lansdorp/Visuals Unlimited/Corbis
Matching DNA With Medical Records To Crack Disease And Aging
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165498842/165507940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Beatles rehearse for that night's Royal Variety Performance at the Prince of Wales Theatre in 1963. Central/Hulton Achive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Central/Hulton Achive/Getty Images
The Beatles' Surprising Contribution To Brain Science
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164101652/164669412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Residents of the Colonial Place neighborhood watch as heavy rain from Hurricane Sandy floods the Lafayette River in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 28. Rich-Joseph Facun/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Rich-Joseph Facun/Reuters/Landov
Protection From The Sea Is Possible, But Expensive
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164435330/164435866" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Motorists drive through standing water at an intersection flooded from the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida in the Ocean View area of Norfolk, Va., in November 2009. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption Steve Helber/AP
Norfolk, Va., Puts Flooding Survival Plan To The Test
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164362276/164389305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These computer models from Oct. 26 of then-Hurricane Sandy show different predictions for the storm's path. NOAA hide caption

toggle caption NOAA
High-Def Storm Models Yielded Accurate Predictions
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/164046039/164054632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

toggle caption Gerry Broome/AP
The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/163867031/163891710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this satellite image provided Friday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hurricane Sandy's huge cloud extent of up to 2,000 miles churns over the Bahamas, as a line of clouds associated with a powerful cold front approaches the East Coast of the U.S. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Handout/Getty Images