Japan Extends Evacuation Zone Near Power Plant

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Japanese Officials: Tap Water Is Safe To Drink

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Three Mile Island engineers William Behrle (from left0, Michael Benson, Sam Griffith and Martin Cooper enter the containment building from the personal airlock in Middletown, Pa., on Aug. 15, 1980. AP hide caption

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AP

Nuclear Workers Take Risks 'For The Public Good'

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Police officers wear gas masks while on patrol in a vehicle at the Fukushima nuclear power plant on March 12. Experts are concerned about the safety of the nuclear workers, but they say that so far, there's no risk for others in Japan or in the U.S. Kaname Yoneyama/AP hide caption

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Kaname Yoneyama/AP

Radiation A Concern For Plant Workers, Not Others

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High Radiation Levels Recorded At Japanese Plant

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Technicians at the Three Mile Island plant enter the outer airlock door leading into the containment building housing the disabled nuclear reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear plan in February 1982. The accident at the Harrisburg, Pa., plant began on March 28, 1979. AP hide caption

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AP

Sizing Up Japan's Nuclear Emergency: No Chernobyl

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Plastic's New Frontier: No Scary Chemicals

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Makers of water bottles, including Camelback, now sell products that don't contain BPA, a chemical that can mimic the sex hormone estrogen. But a new study says that even if they don't contain BPA, most plastic products release estrogenic chemicals. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Study: Most Plastics Leach Hormone-Like Chemicals

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A new study finds that radio waves from a cell phone can affect the metabolism of brain cells, though there is no evidence that the effect is harmful. Here, a pedestrian talks on her phone on a street in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Cell Phone Radio Waves Excite Brain Cells

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Jaime Guevara-Aguirre stands with some of the people who took part in his study of Laron syndrome in Ecuador. Courtesy of Valter Longo hide caption

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Courtesy of Valter Longo

Gene Mutation Key To Ecuador Group's Health

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Elizabet Spaepen, University of Chicago

Without Language, Large Numbers Don't Add Up

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Malcom Brown (left) is hit by Jake Smith on a kickoff return during a high school state championship game in Arlington, Texas, in December. Sports medicine professionals and the NFL are calling for tougher regulations on head injuries sustained by young athletes. Matt Strasen/AP hide caption

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Matt Strasen/AP

Doctors Throw Flags On High School Concussions

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A hormone that impacts memory in rats likely does the same thing in other animals, like humans. S. Ugur Okcu/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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S. Ugur Okcu/iStockphoto.com

Hormone Helps Short-Term Memories Stick Around

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Modern bedbugs are increasingly resistant to pesticides. Some populations, in fact, can survive 1,000 times the amount of pesticide that would be needed to kill a traditional bug. Orkin LLC/AP hide caption

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Orkin LLC/AP

Bedbug Genome Reveals Pesticide Resistance

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In Highlighting Radon's Risks, Context Needed

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