Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/294446735/294899882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors may eventually be able to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who have abnormal brain scans but who aren't yet showing behavioral symptoms of the disease. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Alzheimer's Diagnosis Expanding To Catch Early Warning Signs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/291475129/291475130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists have long sought a way to detect Alzheimer's before symptoms appear. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/286881513/288492940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Should you fear a chemical inside metal food containers like the ones that hold beans? Government scientists say no. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maybe That BPA In Your Canned Food Isn't So Bad After All

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/283030949/283066749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the Institute for the Unsalvageable in Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania, shown here in 1992, children were left in cribs for days on end. Tom Szalay hide caption

toggle caption Tom Szalay

Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/280237833/281916804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStockphoto

Seeing Less Helps The Brain Hear More

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/272092118/272100095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Researchers Watch As Our Brains Turn Sounds Into Words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268432705/268964646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clinical specialist Catey Funaiock took notes while observing a 5-year-old boy at the Marcus Autism Center, part of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, in September. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption David Goldman/AP

A baby born too soon continues to develop and grow inside an incubator at the neonatal ward of the Centre Hospitalier de Lens in Lens, northern France. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

A Growth Factor Heals The Damage To A Preemie's Brain — In Mice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265067479/265070339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The round stingray is native to the eastern Pacific coast and is notorious for injuring swimmers and surfers. laszlo-photo/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption laszlo-photo/Flickr

Mild-Mannered Stingrays Can Inflict A World Of Hurt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/260803538/264399978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A newly discovered neural circuit in the brain of the common fruit fly seems to serve as a sort of "volume control," turning up and down the perception of sound and light. Nicholas Monu/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption Nicholas Monu/iStockphoto

Can A Fruit Fly Help Explain Autism?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/256904807/257542533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A technique called optogenetics is being used in the laboratory to observe and control what brain circuits are doing in real time. Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

toggle caption Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

Experimental Tool Uses Light To Tweak The Living Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/256881128/257394321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's data to support the notion that pot, or a drug based on its active ingredient, could help ease the fears of PTSD. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ted S. Warren/AP

Could Pot Help Veterans With PTSD? Brain Scientists Say Maybe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/256610483/256890187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Forecast Bust:' Why 2013 Hurricane Predictions Were So Wrong

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247825778/247825791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript