Residents survey the destruction after a tornado hit Pratt City, Ala., on April 27. Short-term forecasting of twisters like the ones that swept the South this week has grown increasingly accurate, but long-term forecasting remains highly unreliable. Butch Dill/AP hide caption

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The placenta, the nutrient-rich organ shown in this model as the layer above the baby's feet, makes its own serotonin. Mark Evans/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Babies' Developing Brains Fed By Placenta, Not Mom

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Manholes poke out from the ground in Urayasu, Japan, due to the liquefaction triggered by the 9.0 magnitude earthquake. The phenomenon, which allows sand and water to rise following ground shaking, was particularly pronounced in this area as a result of the long duration of the March 11 quake. Koki Nagahama/Getty Images hide caption

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In Japan, Shaken Soil Turned Soft After Quake

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A Tokyo tuna wholesaler adds slices of fish to his stall on March 23. Fish prices have plummeted in Japan amid fears that radioactive material leaking from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant may have contaminated the animals. But experts say there's no risk right now and that fish is safe to eat. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Sushi Science: Fear, Not Radiation, Seen As Risk

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Japan Self-Defense Force officers in radiation protection suits hold a blue sheet over patients who were exposed to high levels of radiation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant on March 25. A team of experts at Japan's National Institute of Radiological Sciences have helped treat injured workers. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rapid Response Radiation Team Tends To Wounded

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NPR's Jon Hamilton Discusses The Progress Reported At Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Plant

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Japan Extends Evacuation Zone Near Power Plant

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Japanese Officials: Tap Water Is Safe To Drink

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Three Mile Island engineers William Behrle (from left0, Michael Benson, Sam Griffith and Martin Cooper enter the containment building from the personal airlock in Middletown, Pa., on Aug. 15, 1980. AP hide caption

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Nuclear Workers Take Risks 'For The Public Good'

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Police officers wear gas masks while on patrol in a vehicle at the Fukushima nuclear power plant on March 12. Experts are concerned about the safety of the nuclear workers, but they say that so far, there's no risk for others in Japan or in the U.S. Kaname Yoneyama/AP hide caption

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Radiation A Concern For Plant Workers, Not Others

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High Radiation Levels Recorded At Japanese Plant

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Technicians at the Three Mile Island plant enter the outer airlock door leading into the containment building housing the disabled nuclear reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear plan in February 1982. The accident at the Harrisburg, Pa., plant began on March 28, 1979. AP hide caption

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Sizing Up Japan's Nuclear Emergency: No Chernobyl

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Plastic's New Frontier: No Scary Chemicals

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Makers of water bottles, including Camelback, now sell products that don't contain BPA, a chemical that can mimic the sex hormone estrogen. But a new study says that even if they don't contain BPA, most plastic products release estrogenic chemicals. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Study: Most Plastics Leach Hormone-Like Chemicals

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