The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all. Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications hide caption

toggle caption Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications

Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Francis Csedrik remembers details of being bonked hard on the head when he was 4, and having to go to the emergency room. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Meg Vogel/NPR

Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions. Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital hide caption

toggle caption Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Doctors may eventually be able to diagnose "preclinical" Alzheimer's in patients who have abnormal brain scans but who aren't yet showing behavioral symptoms of the disease. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Scientists have long sought a way to detect Alzheimer's before symptoms appear. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Should you fear a chemical inside metal food containers like the ones that hold beans? Government scientists say no. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In the Institute for the Unsalvageable in Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania, shown here in 1992, children were left in cribs for days on end. Tom Szalay hide caption

toggle caption Tom Szalay
iStockphoto
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Clinical specialist Catey Funaiock took notes while observing a 5-year-old boy at the Marcus Autism Center, part of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, in September. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption David Goldman/AP

A baby born too soon continues to develop and grow inside an incubator at the neonatal ward of the Centre Hospitalier de Lens in Lens, northern France. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor