Patong beach in Phuket, Thailand, was destroyed by the tsunami on Dec. 25, 2004. More than 230,000 people died. Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

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Tips For Surviving A Mega-Disaster

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Instructional assistant Jessica Reeder touches her nose to get Jacob Day, 3, who has autism, to focus his attention on her during a therapy session in April 2007. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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The Human Voice May Not Spark Pleasure In Children With Autism

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Barton Holmes, 2, sits with his father, Kevin Holmes, and his mother, Catherine McEaddy Holmes, during an appointment at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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With Epilepsy Treatment, The Goal Is To Keep Kids Seizure-Free

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Hurricane Sandy churns off the Atlantic coast on Oct. 29. NOAA officials are forecasting seven to 11 hurricanes, compared with about six in a typical season. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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'Extremely Active' Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

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Despite significant advances in neurology and imaging, researchers still don't have simple lab tests for diagnosing patients with mental disorders. Diagnoses are still mostly based on a patient's signs and symptoms. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Why Is Psychiatry's New Manual So Much Like The Old One?

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How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different?

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Although a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain

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Bates experienced migraines as a child. She made this painting to depict how they felt to her. Courtesy of Emily Bates hide caption

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A Sleep Gene Has A Surprising Role In Migraines

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In this Jan. 18 photo provided by the NYU Langone Medical Center, a technician examines mice to determine their health at the hospital's complex in New York. New York University/AP hide caption

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A Tale Of Mice And Medical Research, Wiped Out By A Superstorm

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Scientists hope a new genetically modified rat will help them find Alzheimer's drugs that work on humans. Ryumin Alexander/ITAR-TASS/Landov hide caption

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Genetically Modified Rat Is Promising Model For Alzheimer's

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Composer Richard Einhorn lost most of his hearing several years ago, but that hasn't held him back, thanks to state-of-the-art digital hearing aids. Kevin Rivoli/AP hide caption

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Listen Up To Smarter, Smaller Hearing Aids

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A colored 3-D MRI scan of the brain's white matter pathways traces connections between cells in the cerebrum and the brainstem. Tom Barrick, Chris Clark, SGHMS /Science Source hide caption

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Obama's Plan To Explore The Brain: A 'Most Audacious' Project

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A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds no link between the number of vaccinations a young child receives and the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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