Abby Mahoney, 13, has Asperger's syndrome. She says she has memorized nearly everything there is to know about Star Wars. Her enthusiasm for the subject helped make her the target of a bullying boy. Courtesy of the Mahoney family hide caption

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Children With Autism Are Often Targeted By Bullies
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Researchers studied baboons, including this one, and found that with training, they could distinguish real four-letter English words from four letters that weren't a word. Joel Fagot/Science/AAAS hide caption

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The (Monkey) Business Of Recognizing Words
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Study Warns Of Autism Risk For Children Of Obese Mothers
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Environmental groups say a ban would protect consumers from the health effects of BPA that leaches from products including some soup cans. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Feds Reject Petition To Ban BPA In Food
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This image shows the grid structure of the major pathways of the brain. It was created using a scanner that's part of the Human Connectome Project, a five-year effort which is studying and mapping the human brain. MGH-UCLA Human Connectome Project hide caption

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How Your Brain Is Like Manhattan
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Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney clashed often during Wednesday's GOP debate. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Inconsistency: The Real Hobgoblin
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Pinwheels like these are often used to test nerve responses. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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New Methods Could Speed Up Repair Of Injured Nerves
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Addicts' Brains May Be Wired At Birth For Less Self-Control
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Chris Stephens, 28, who has been battling depression all of his life, plays with his dogs at home in Concord, Calif., on Friday. After a dose of ketamine, Stephens says, "I actually wanted to do things. I wanted to live life." Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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'I Wanted To Live': New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases
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Ketamine has been used as an anesthetic for decades. It's also a widely popular but illegal club drug known as "Special K." When administered in low doses, patients report a rapid reduction in depression symptoms. Huw Golledge/flickr hide caption

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Could A Club Drug Offer 'Almost Immediate' Relief From Depression?
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Even in the remote Faroe Islands, some children have high levels of perfluorinated compounds in their blood. The chemicals may interfere with the immune system. Stig Nygaard/Flickr hide caption

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Common Chemicals Could Make Kids' Vaccines Less Effective
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Researchers claimed in late 2010 that they found bacteria in Mono Lake, Calif., that survived on the poison arsenic in the place of an element thought essential to life. The report was immediately greeted with skepticism from the scientific community. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Debunked Science: Studies Take Heat In 2011
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A tufted capuchin uses a stone hammer to crack open a nut in Brazil's Parnaiba Headwaters National Park. Ben Cranke/Getty Images hide caption

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Myth Busting: The Truth About Animals And Tools
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