For best quality of life, many cancer patients who can't be cured might do best to forgo chemo and focus instead on pain relief and easing sleep and mood problems, a survey of caregivers suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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National Institutes of Health funding has been flat for years. iStockphoto hide caption

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A user prepares drugs for injection in 2014 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Stanford University study explored the medical records of millions of people looking for patterns. People taking proton-pump inhibitors for chronic heartburn seemed to be at somewhat higher risk of having a heart attack than people not taking the pills. IStockphoto hide caption

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A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes — they're yellow — that help the virus infect its host cells. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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The posterior end of the Loa loa worm is visible on the left. The disease-causing worm can now be located with a smartphone/microscope hookup. That's a big help because a drug to treat river blindness can be risky if the patient is carrying the worm. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Skierski at the beach in Avalon, N.J., just hours before he fell ill and went to the hospital. He never went home. Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers hide caption

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Rod-shaped specimens of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial cause of plague, find a happy home here in the foregut of a flea. Fleas can transmit the infection to animals and people, who can get pneumonic plague and transmit the infection through a cough or kiss. Science Source hide caption

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