False-color transmission electron micrograph of a field of whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis. A. Barry Dowsett/Science Source hide caption

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Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

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This mouse egg (top) is being injected with genetic material from an adult cell to ultimately create an embryo — and, eventually, embryonic stem cells. The process has been difficult to do with human cells. James King-Holmes/Science Source hide caption

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First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man's Skin

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In this colored transmission electron micrograph, an infected cell (reddish brown) releases a single Ebola virus (the blue hook). As it exits, the virus takes along part of the host cell's membrane (pink, center), too. That deters the host's immune defenses from recognizing the virus as foreign. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine/Science Source hide caption

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Ebola Drug Could Be Ready For Human Testing Next Year

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I'm not trying to lead you astray. It's just that scientists are not skeptical enough about their mouse studies. iStockphoto hide caption

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How Mouse Studies Lead Medical Research Down Dead Ends

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An artist's illustration shows lung cancer cells lurking among healthy air sacs. David Mack/Science Source hide caption

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Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

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The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda hide caption

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Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

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iStockphoto

Fewer People Are Getting Infections In Hospitals, But Many Still Die

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Your schnoz deserves more respect. epSos .de/Flickr hide caption

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Never Mind Eyesight, Your Nose Knows Much More

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Adam Cole/NPR

Google's Flu Tracker Suffers From Sniffles

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A channel big enough to handle global shipping would require deep dredging throughout Lake Nicaragua, the largest source of fresh water in Central America. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Scientists Fear Ecological Disaster In Nicaragua's Planned Canal

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Report: Burning Natural Gas Is Better Than Using Coal

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Until recently, finding characteristic stone and bone tools was the only way to trace the fate of the Clovis people, whose culture appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago. Sarah L. Anzick/Nature hide caption

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Ancient DNA Ties Native Americans From Two Continents To Clovis

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Clive Hamilton's new book Earthmasters. Courtesy of Yale University Press hide caption

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Risky Tech Fixes For Climate Becoming Likelier, Critic Warns

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The Climate Casino by William Nordhaus looks at the economics and politics of global warming. Courtesy of Yale University Press hide caption

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Economist Says Best Climate Fix A Tough Sell, But Worth It

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