A Tokyo sushi restaurant displays blocks of fat meat tuna cut out from a 269kg bluefin tuna. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nuclear Tuna Is Hot News, But Not Because It's Going To Make You Sick

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Researcher Hans Roy opens a core sample taken from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. A core sample like this one contained bacteria that settled on the seafloor 86 million years ago. Bo Barker Jorgensen/Science/AAAS hide caption

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Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat

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Layers of earthquake-twisted ground are seen where the 14 freeway crosses the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale, Calif. The San Andreas Fault, like the kind that caused the huge earthquake off the coast of Indonesia, is a strike-slip fault, where the tectonic plates slide past each other. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Was A Huge 'Rogue Earthquake' Not Destructive?

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The statue of Freedom, atop of the U.S. Capitol Building, is pictured against a "supermoon" on March 19, 2011. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Look Up: Tonight, 'Supermoon' Is Closer To Earth

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Researchers studying Greenland's ice say it is melting more slowlyl than previously thought. Here, ice travels down a relatively small outlet glacier into the sea. Ian Joughin/Science/AAAS hide caption

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Greenland's Ice Melting More Slowly Than Expected

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Germany plans to take all of its nuclear power plants offline by 2022, which means coal-fired power plants like the Kraftwerk Westfalen, in Hamm, Germany, will be a key component of the country's energy infrastructure. Lars Baron/Getty Images hide caption

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Countries Losing Steam On Climate Change Initiatives

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In this undated picture, Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,029 feet, stands behind the Khumbu Glacier, one of the longest glaciers in the world. Nepal has more than 2,300 glacial lakes, and experts say at least 20 are in danger of bursting. Subel Bhandari/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Melt Or Grow? Fate Of Himalayan Glaciers Unknown

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A robotic arm breaks off a chunk of mineral-rich rock deep underwater. Nautilus Minerals of Australia hopes to develop and expand undersea mining by extracting copper, gold, silver and zinc from the seafloor. Nautilus Minerals hide caption

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Gold Miners Dig Deep — To The Ocean Floor

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Researchers have analyzed the fossil imprints of of raindrops, like the ones shown here, to study the atmosphere of the Earth, as it was 2.7 billion years ago. The rule at the top is 5 centimeters, or about 2 inches, long. W. Alterman/University of Pretoria hide caption

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Raindrops In Rock: Clues To A Perplexing Paradox

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A drilling rig sits on Oooguruk Island off the coast of Alaska's North Slope. The 6-acre island was built by Pioneer Natural Resources so it could drill for oil on the Arctic Ocean. Steve Quinn/AP hide caption

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Native Alaskans Divided On State's Oil Drilling Debate

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F. Sherwood Rowland, pictured here in 1989, was one of three chemists who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize for chemistry for work on discovering chemicals that deplete the Earth's ozone layer. University of California/AP hide caption

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F. Sherwood Rowland, Warned Of Aerosol's Danger

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Last year's earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Foreign journalists saw cleanup and recovery work in process on Feb. 28. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

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A worker is given a radiation screening as he enters the emergency operation center at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 20. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trauma, Not Radiation, Is Key Concern In Japan

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Neutrinos May Not Travel Faster Than Light After All

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From left, enginers Eric Nicosia, Amin Ahmadi and Gavin Boogs work to solve an issue with part of a wind turbine at the Gamesa Corp. factory in Langhorne, Pa., on Feb. 10. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Many Jobs May Be Gone With The Wind Energy Credit

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