A little chilly for camping: Ice-penetrating radar revealed a mega-canyon below the Greenland ice sheet, extending for more than 460 miles. Courtesy of J. Bamber/University of Bristol hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of J. Bamber/University of Bristol

Rock islands dot the ocean in Palau, Micronesia. The waters of the tropical Pacific Ocean have been relatively cool for the last 15 years. Christopher Ward/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Christopher Ward/Corbis

Kevin Trenberth is a distinguished senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Rich Crowder/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Rich Crowder/Corbis

Judith Curry with her dogs, Rosie (left) and Bruno, in the mountains near Lake Tahoe. The climatologist focuses on the uncertainties of climate change far more than on the consensus of climate scientists. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Harris/NPR

Lake Eyre in South Australia is normally a dry salt pan and rarely fills with water. But it did after massive rains two years ago, and is seen here on May 20, 2011. Theo Allofs/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Theo Allofs/Corbis

Plants accumulate carbon in the spring and summer, and they release it back into the atmosphere in the fall in winter. And a change in the landscape of the Arctic tundra, seen here, means that shrubs hold onto snow better, which keeps the organic-rich soils warmer and more likely to release carbon dioxide that's stored there. Jean-Erick Pasquier/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jean-Erick Pasquier/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Changes to the acidity of the Earth's ancient oceans affected the coral reefs more than 50 million years ago. And researchers are using that information to try to predict how the planet might fare in our rapidly changing climate. Above, the Wheeler Reef section of the Great Barrier Reef. Auscape/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Auscape/UIG via Getty Images

Roughnecks build a drilling rig at the MEG Energy site near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. In addition to large, open-pit mining operations, tar sands oil can be extracted from the ground by pumping down high-pressure steam. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Felipe Dana/AP

Biologists normally look for the hellbender slamander, which is known by the nickname "snot otter," under rocks in streams. But now there's a gentler way: They can take water samples and look for traces of the animals' DNA. Robert J. Erwin/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Robert J. Erwin/Science Source

Scientists could use recordings of wildlife to monitor the movements of invasive species like the European starling. Liz Leyden/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Liz Leyden/iStockphoto.com

The "Giant Tabular Iceberg" floats in Antarctica's Ross Sea in December 2011. Under a proposed new international agreement, large sections of the oceans around Antarctica would become protected as a marine preserve. Camille Seaman/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Camille Seaman/Barcroft Media/Landov

Jay Keasling (left), speaking with Rajit Sapar at the Joint BioEnergy Institute, is pioneering a technique to develop diesel fuel from yeast. Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Global Thermostat's pilot plant in Menlo Park, Calif., pulls carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. The next challenge is to find uses for the captured gas. Courtesy of Global Thermostat hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Global Thermostat