Michelle Flandez's son Inti Perez — pictured at home in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, in 2016 — was born with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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Turns out humans are better at smelling than you might think. CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images

Why Your Sense Of Smell Is Better Than You Might Think

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the risks of screening for thyroid cancer in people without symptoms outweigh the benefits. kaisersosa67/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Screen For Thyroid Cancer, Task Force Says

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Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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Seattle Mayor Ed Murray reads a statement to media members Friday, in Seattle. A lawsuit filed Thursday accuses Murray of sexually molesting a teenage high-school dropout in the 1980s. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Nearly two-thirds of cell mutations that cause cancer are caused by random error, a study found. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Sometimes fast-acting chemotherapy can help slow an aggressive cancer — and give the slower-acting immunotherapies a chance to work. UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images

Old-Style Chemo Is Still A Mainstay In The Age Of Targeted Cancer Therapy

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This computer-enhanced barium contrast X-ray shows colon cancer in red. Researchers have been trying to figure out what looks to be a decade-long rise in colon cancer among people younger than 50. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

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Scott Camazine/Science Source