The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda hide caption

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Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch
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Fewer People Are Getting Infections In Hospitals, But Many Still Die
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Your schnoz deserves more respect. epSos .de/Flickr hide caption

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Never Mind Eyesight, Your Nose Knows Much More
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A channel big enough to handle global shipping would require deep dredging throughout Lake Nicaragua, the largest source of fresh water in Central America. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Scientists Fear Ecological Disaster In Nicaragua's Planned Canal
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Report: Burning Natural Gas Is Better Than Using Coal
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Until recently, finding characteristic stone and bone tools was the only way to trace the fate of the Clovis people, whose culture appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago. Sarah L. Anzick/Nature hide caption

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Ancient DNA Ties Native Americans From Two Continents To Clovis
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Clive Hamilton's new book Earthmasters. Courtesy of Yale University Press hide caption

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Risky Tech Fixes For Climate Becoming Likelier, Critic Warns
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The Climate Casino by William Nordhaus looks at the economics and politics of global warming. Courtesy of Yale University Press hide caption

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Economist Says Best Climate Fix A Tough Sell, But Worth It
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Massive sections of ice (center front) have broken away from the Jakobshavn glacier into the sea. There's enough water stored in Greenland's glaciers to raise the sea level by 20 feet. Ian Joughin/Science/AAAS hide caption

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Glacier Blamed For Berg That Sank Titanic Unleashes More Ice
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Love your hair. Artists' depictions of a Neanderthal man and woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Neanderthal Genes Live On In Our Hair And Skin
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Each year, 6 to 8 percent of the global population of sharks and rays gets caught, scientists say. The fish can't reproduce fast enough to keep pace Mike Johnston/Flickr hide caption

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Ancient And Vulnerable: 25 Percent Of Sharks And Rays Risk Extinction
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An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder
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A sperm whale entangled in a drift net. A report says commercial fisheries around the world kill or injure 650,000 mammals a year. Alberto Romero/Marine Photobank hide caption

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Whales, Dolphins Are Collateral Damage In Our Taste For Seafood
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