Doby Photography /NPR
Ina Jaffe 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Ina Jaffe

Correspondent, National Desk

Ina Jaffe is a veteran NPR correspondent covering the aging of America in all its variety. Her stories on Morning Edition and All Things Considered have focused on older adults' involvement in politics and elections, dating and divorce, work and retirement, fashion and sports, as well as issues affecting long term care and end of life choices. She also has an ongoing spot on Weekend Edition with Scott Simon called "1 in 5" where she discusses issues relevant to the 1/5 of the U.S. population that will be 65 years old or more by 2030.

Ina also reports on politics, contributing to NPR's coverage of national elections in 2008, 2010, and 2012.

From her base at NPR's production center in Culver City, California, Ina has covered most of the region's major news events from the beating of Rodney King to the election of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. She's also developed award-winning enterprise pieces. Her 2012 investigation into how the West Los Angeles VA made millions from renting vacant property while ignoring plans to house homeless veterans won an award from the Society of Professional Journalists as well as a Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media. A few months after the story aired, the West Los Angeles VA broke ground on supportive housing for homeless vets.

Her year-long coverage on the rising violence in California's public psychiatric hospitals won the 2011 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award as well as a Gracie Award. Her 2010 series on California's tough three strikes law was honored by the American Bar Association with the Silver Gavel Award, as well as by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon which made its debut in 1985.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe attended the University of Wisconsin and DePaul University receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

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Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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Volunteer Julia Torrano helps Estelle Day, 79, style her hair while she's a patient at UCLA Medical Center. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Hospital Companions Can Ease Isolation For Older People

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Donald Trump Reaches $25 Million Settlement In Trump University Case

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President-Elect's Legal Team Wants Judge To Delay Trump University Case

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This is the gear that runs SentabTV. The flat box accesses the Internet. The remote works both TV programs, video chat, sharing photographs and more. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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For Startups Marketing To Seniors, A Novel Idea: Move In With Them

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Tom Hayden, Anti-Vietnam War Activist Turned Lawmaker, Dies

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Reiko Tsuzuki, 70, makes buckwheat soba noodles by hand in her restaurant kitchen in the Japanese island of Shikoku. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japan's Centuries-Old Tradition Of Making Soba Noodles

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The Chichu Art Museum, designed by celebrated Japanese architect Tadao Ando, is built mostly underground. Open courtyards and skylights bring in natural light. The island is internationally known for its works of modern art and architecture. Seiichi Ohsawa Courtesy of Benesse Art Site Naoshima hide caption

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Seiichi Ohsawa Courtesy of Benesse Art Site Naoshima

Tsukimi Ayano's scarecrows congregate at a bus stop in Nagoro. The village used to be home to about 300 people; now there are 30. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

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Nenosuke Yamamoto, 80, stands in the shed where he repairs bicycles in Tokyo. "I feel that if I keep on working, I might not age as much," he says. "I might not have dementia or other sorts of aging issues." Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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For Some Older Adults In Japan, A Chance To Stay In The Workforce

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Hiroyuki Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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This Lawson convenience store in Kowaguchi, Japan, sells a selection of prepared meals and fresh vegetables and meats, along with products aimed at the elderly. Many of the store's older customers find it hard to get to the supermarket, the store's manager says. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Beyond Slurpees: Many Japanese Mini-Marts Now Cater To Elders

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How Japan Is Dealing With Impacts Of Supporting The Oldest Population In The World

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Could Thinking Positively About Aging Be The Secret Of Health?

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A voter enters a polling place on May 3 in Whiting, Ind. Older voters feel that the issues that concern them haven't been mentioned enough on the campaign trail. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Older Voters To Candidates: Don't Forget About Us

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