Ina Jaffe 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Ina Jaffe 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Ina Jaffe

Correspondent, National Desk

Ina Jaffe is a veteran NPR correspondent covering the aging of America in all its variety. Her stories on Morning Edition and All Things Considered have focused on older adults' involvement in politics and elections, dating and divorce, work and retirement, fashion and sports, as well as issues affecting long term care and end of life choices. She also has an ongoing spot on Weekend Edition with Scott Simon called "1 in 5" where she discusses issues relevant to the 1/5 of the U.S. population that will be 65 years old or more by 2030.

Ina also reports on politics, contributing to NPR's coverage of national elections in 2008, 2010, and 2012.

From her base at NPR's production center in Culver City, California, Ina has covered most of the region's major news events from the beating of Rodney King to the election of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. She's also developed award-winning enterprise pieces. Her 2012 investigation into how the West Los Angeles VA made millions from renting vacant property while ignoring plans to house homeless veterans won an award from the Society of Professional Journalists as well as a Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media. A few months after the story aired, the West Los Angeles VA broke ground on supportive housing for homeless vets.

Her year-long coverage on the rising violence in California's public psychiatric hospitals won the 2011 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award as well as a Gracie Award. Her 2010 series on California's tough three strikes law was honored by the American Bar Association with the Silver Gavel Award, as well as by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon which made its debut in 1985.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe attended the University of Wisconsin and DePaul University receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

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Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case
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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals
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Ruby Duncan is a Hillary Clinton supporter, and says younger women don't understand earlier struggles. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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In Nevada, Will A Generation Gap Over Democratic Candidates Persist?
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The routines that students learn at Dance for PD classes in Venice, Calif., can be quite challenging, instructors say. Courtesy of Joe Lambie and Laura Karlin hide caption

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Dance Returns The 'Joy Of Movement' To People With Parkinson's
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Southern California Moves To Protect Homeless As El Niño Rain Hits Region
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Elizabeth Laird, Who Gave Hugs To Soldiers At Fort Hood, Dies At 83
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A hearing test you take on your phone provides immediate, private feedback. George Doyle/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Is Everybody Mumbling? Try A Hearing Test You Take On The Phone
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Gloria Steinem Shares What She Learned 'On The Road'
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Lydia Smith stands in the kitchen of her home in the Westlake neighborhood of Los Angeles. She has lived in this apartment for 46 years, and now that she is on a fixed income, she pays rent with the aid of Section 8 tenant-based assistance. Megan Miller for NPR hide caption

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For Women, Income Inequality Continues Into Retirement
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Proponents of arbitration say the system is more efficient than going to court for both sides, but arbitration can be costly, too. And a 2009 study showed the typical awards in nursing home cases are about 35 percent lower than the plaintiff would get if the case went to court. Heinz Linke/Westend61/Corbis hide caption

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Suing A Nursing Home Could Get Easier Under Proposed Federal Rules
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State governments are trying to help people save for retirement. Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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States To Workers: Let Us Help You Build Your Retirement Savings
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Activists for and against Proposition 187 rallied in Los Angeles in 1996, after it was thrown out by the courts. Political analysts say tough rhetoric and laws targeting illegal immigration could now have lasting political consequences for the national Republican Party. Frank Wiese/AP hide caption

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From California, A Warning To Republicans On Anti-Immigration Rhetoric
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Social Security A Targeted Issue For GOP Candidates
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Donald Trump (left) arrives to announce his bid to run for president on June 16. Arnold Schwarzenegger (right) appeared on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno and announced he was running for governor of California on Aug. 6, 2003. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images and Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Before There Was The Donald, There Was Arnold
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Of the roughly 40 houses currently rented in Hope Meadows in Rantou, Ill., 10 are occupied by families who've adopted children from foster care. The rest are occupied by older adults who volunteer to help them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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A Community Built Around Older Adults Caring For Adoptive Families
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