Senate Hearing On Climate Bill Heats Up

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Using Trees To Curb Climate Change Not So Simple

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A snowy tree cricket feeds on a leaf from a mountain dalea plant. Gerardine Vargas hide caption

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Slo-Mo Cricket Chirps Reveal Secret Serenades

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Do Offsets Really Help Reduce Emissions?

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Move Over, Lucy; Ardi May Be Oldest Human Ancestor

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An aggressive encounter between two male greater prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido). During aggressive encounters, males leap into the air and strike their opponent with feet, wings and/or beak. Fort Pierre National Grassland, South Dakota. Gerrit Vyn/gerritvynphoto.com hide caption

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Grunts And Gurgles Signal Love For Grouse

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Senate Unveils Plan To Reduce Emissions

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A stunning golden tapestry woven from spider silk is unveiled at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City after four years of work — and the help of more than 1 million spiders. R. Mickens/AMNH hide caption

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Spider Wranglers Weave One-Of-A-Kind Tapestry

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Even T. Rex Started Small

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A smallmouth bass caught on a lake near Ely, Minn. One-third of smallmouths surveyed by the USGS showed signs of intersex. Sam Cook hide caption

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Study: Gender-Bending Fish Widespread In U.S.

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Julie Feinstein, collection manager of frozen tissue lab at AMNH, removes a rack of samples from one of the liquid nitrogen-cooled storage vats. She's wearing special gloves so that, as she puts it, she doesn't stay attached to the vat. R. Mickens/AMNH hide caption

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DNA 'Barcode' To Help Nab Illegal Wildlife Traders

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A farmer plants soybeans in an untilled field. No-till farming, in which crops are planted into last year's field stubble without plowing, has gained acceptance in the past two decades as a way to build organic matter, reduce erosion and control pesticides and fertilizers. J.D. Pooley/AP hide caption

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Can Dirt Really Save Us From Global Warming?

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Renewable Energy Needs Land, Lots Of Land

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The coats of domestic dogs vary wildly and can be long, short, straight, wavy, curly or more. Pictured here (left to right) are three breeds with different coat types: Saluki, Vizsla and Samoyed. Tyrone Spady hide caption

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Dog Hair May Shed Light On Cancer

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For Early Man, It Wasn't Easier Being Green

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