A bladder at a camp in Port-au-Prince holds fresh water. Sanitation and clean water are key to staving off cholera, and public health officials are launching a massive education effort using text messages and radio broadcasts. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Text Messages, Radio Warn Haitians Of Cholera Risks

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Two trucks crashed on a road toward Saint-Marc in Haiti. One truck was carrying Coke bottles, the other was full of people. The head-on collision knocked the bed off the back of one truck, killing several and injuring many more. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Philomena Josephat and her father Joseph at St. Nicholas Hospital. Joseph, who has recovered from cholera, said: "I've never felt sick like that before, but I lost a child, and since then my health left me. And with this, that's even worse. I felt like I was dying." Carl Thalemaque for NPR hide caption

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At Cholera Epicenter, Chaos, But Signs Of Control

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A banner in a street in Port-au-Prince urges people to wash with soap. Though the cholera epidemic has stabilized for now, health officials are working to contain and quell the outbreak and warn that the epidemic is not yet over. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Health Experts Keep Close Eye On Cholera In Haiti

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A worker with Home Energy Loss Professionals, a Maryland company, retrofits the attic of a home. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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'Cash For Caulkers' Seals Savings For Homeowners

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Microbes May Have Eaten Methane From BP Spill

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Scientists discovered stones for grounding flour in Italy used 30,000 years ago by hunter gatherers. Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e Protostoria hide caption

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Inside Veolia Energy's Plant Three in Baltimore, blue pipes carry chilled water that will be sent out to cool nearby buildings. The green pipes carry condensed water that removes heat from the chilling system, and orange pipes carry a refrigerant. The yellow pipes are for a future cooling system. Mike Ruocco/NPR hide caption

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Chilled-Out Buildings Save Energy, Money

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Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen testifies Monday before the commission investigating the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Though Allen was the government's leader of the spill response, he acknowledged it was not always clear to the public who was in charge. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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At Oil Spill Hearing, Calls For New Response Plan

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A male Florida panther walks down Jane's Scenic Drive in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park. Before scientists bred the Florida panthers with cats from Texas, they lacked vitality and were near extinction. Science/AAAS hide caption

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Bounding, Rebounding: Panthers Make A Comeback

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Archaeologists have unearthed a wealth of new information about dinosaurs in the past decade thanks in large part to new technology.  But the T. Rex's telegenic charisma and popular appeal are something that even scientists aren't immune from. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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T. Rex Renaissance: Big Decade For Dino Research

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Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Fla., took in many animals that were displaced or oiled by the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Above, a Kemp's ridley turtle recovers in a tank at Mote. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Marine Scientists Seek Standards For Spill Research

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Deep In Gulf Water, Bacteria Are Eating Spilled Oil

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A loggerhead turtle was found oiled in the Gulf waters. It was cleaned on-site, then sent to Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Fla., for rehabilitation and monitoring. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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'Virtual Shellfish' Aid In Studying Oil's Effects

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Almost 2 million gallons of oil dispersants were used to dilute the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and though testing indicates the toxic chemical has largely dissipated in the water, scientists warn that the long-term effects are still unknown. Above, a dispersant plane passes over an oil skimmer in the Gulf of Mexico. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Lasting Impact Of Dispersants Unclear, Senate Told

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