A forest near Trieste, Italy, is largely dead owing to drought stress during the summer of 2012. Andrea Nardini/Nature hide caption

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An Arbor Embolism? Why Trees Die In Drought
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Energy Of The Future? California company Sierra Energy is testing out a reactor that turns garbage — like these wood chips, metal fragments and plastics — into synthetic gas that can then be turned into a low-carbon diesel fuel. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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A 'Green' Gold Rush? Calif. Firm Turns Trash To Gas
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California begins a new plan to ration greenhouse gas emissions from large companies on Wednesday. Big companies must limit the greenhouse gases they emit and get permits for those emissions. Above, the Department of Water and Power San Fernando Valley Generating Station, in Sun Valley, Calif., in 2008. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Calif. To Begin Rationing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
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Consolidated Edison workers try to repair damage near the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Fixing NYC's Underground Power Grid Is No Easy Task
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Power Outage From Sandy One Of Biggest Ever In U.S.
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This artistic interpretation shows an adult and juvenile feathered ornithomimid dinosaurs. Julius Csotonyi/Science hide caption

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Hey, Sexy Dino, Show Me Your Feathers
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Actors Stan Laurel and Edna Marlon play at socializing around the campfire. It turns out that early man's brain developed in part thanks to cooking. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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This image, from an archival video, shows the white whale NOC swimming around and under researchers' boats. Current Biology hide caption

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Baby Beluga, Swim So Wild And Sing For Me
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Scientists Solve Mystery Of Disappearing Salt Marshes
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A fragment of the meteor that crashed into Tissint, Morocco. Mark Mauthner/Heritage Auctions hide caption

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For Sale: A Chunk Of Mars
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Bedrich Benes and Michel Abdul-Massih
Software Calculates City-Specific Carbon Footprint
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Invasive brown tree snakes have gobbled up most of Guam's native forest birds. Without these avian predators to keep their numbers in check, the island's spider population has exploded. Isaac Chellman/Rice University hide caption

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Hungry Snakes Trap Guam In Spidery Web
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An artist's re-creation of the first human migration to North America from across the Bering Sea. DEA Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

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What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change
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The shiny blue berries of the tropical Pollia condensata plant rely on their looks, not nutritional content, to attract birds to spread their seeds. Silvia Vignolini et al. via PNAS hide caption

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A Berry So Shiny, It's Irresistible (And Inedible)
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