Wind turbines at the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm in Whitewater, Calif., in 2012. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Is The Sky The Limit For Wind Power?

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Thousands of "fairy circles" dot the landscape of the NamibRand Nature Reserve in Namibia. Why these barren circles appear in grassland areas has puzzled scientists for years. N. Juergens/AAAS/Science hide caption

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N. Juergens/AAAS/Science

What's Behind The 'Fairy Circles' That Dot West Africa?

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Jane Goodall Apologizes For Lifted Passages In Her Upcoming Book

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This photo from a Kyodo News helicopter shows a flame of natural gas from a Japanese deep-sea drilling ship on Tuesday. This successful extraction of methane from the seafloor was a world first. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

Could Tapping Undersea Methane Lead To A New Gas Boom?

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Scientists say they have put together a record of global temperatures dating back to the end of the last ice age, about 11,000 years ago. This historical artwork of the last ice age was made by Swiss geologist and naturalist Oswald Heer. Oswald Heer/Science Source hide caption

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Oswald Heer/Science Source

Past Century's Global Temperature Change Is Fastest On Record

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In this Sept. 1, 2008, photo released by Wildlife Conservation Society, a male forest elephant strides across Langoue Bai, Gabon. Elizabeth M. Rogers/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP hide caption

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Elizabeth M. Rogers/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP

Elephant Poaching Pushes Species To Brink Of Extinction

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'Extinction Looms' For Forest Elephants Due To Poaching

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Energy Secretary Nominee Is An Academic, Politico

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American Electric Power's natural gas-burning plant in Dresden, Ohio, is one of the energy company's new investments in alternatives to coal-burning plants. Michael Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Natural Gas Dethrones King Coal As Power Companies Look To Future

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The Boston Tea Party museum sits right on the edge of the harbor. With rising sea levels and the increasing threat of strong storms, buildings like these are at particular risk of flooding. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Christopher Joyce/NPR

Boston Grapples With The Threat Of Storms And Rising Water

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Plosky Tolbachnik volcano erupts in Russia's Far Eastern Kamchatka Peninsula on Jan. 6, 2013. It's not a so-called "super volcano," but every million years or so scientists say the Earth burps up volcanoes that can erupt for thousands of years. Alexander Petrov/AP hide caption

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Alexander Petrov/AP

Is The Earth Cooking Up Another Super Volcano?

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Highly detailed sonar systems aboard the research vessel Pritchard gave researchers a clear view of the sediment on the seafloor off Long Island. Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas hide caption

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Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas

Sand After Sandy: Scientists Map Seafloor For Sediment

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A United Airlines 787 Dreamliner arrives at O'Hare international Airport in Chicago in November. Aviation authorities in the U.S. and abroad have grounded the planes because of problems with batteries on board. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Powerful But Fragile: The Challenge Of Lithium Batteries

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Much of the money from the Hurricane Sandy relief bill the House of Representatives passed will fund beach and infrastructure restoration projects in areas such as Mantoloking, N.J., seen on Oct. 31. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

Experts Urge Caution As $50 Billion In Sandy Aid Passes House

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A woman with the Army Corps of Engineers documents a destroyed home last month in a residential area of New Dorp Beach on Staten Island in New York City. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

New York Planners Prep For A 'New Normal' Of Powerful Storms

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