A technician checks a spot with a Geiger counter in a forest that burned in 1992. The wildfire released radioactive particles into the air that were deposited there during the 1986 nuclear accident at Chernobyl. Experts worry nearby forest, which is becoming overgrown, could again be ripe for a blaze. Patrick Landmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Challenges Loom Large, 25 Years After Chernobyl

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Phil Radford, executive director of Greenpeace USA, inspects oil-covered reeds while visiting the disaster site on May 20, 2010 south of Venice, Louisiana. A year after the spill, BP has yet to distribute $450 million dollars to scientists studying the disaster. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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'Quagmire Of Bureaucracy' Stifles Gulf Spill Research

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This plant-eating dinosaur, Protoceratops andrewsi, was active day and night, like many other herbivorous dinosaurs. Researchers used measurements from the animal's eye socket to determine when it was most active. Courtesy Lars Schmitz hide caption

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Dozens of spent fuel rod assemblies can be stored in dry casks, like the ones here at the James A. Fitzpatrick nuclear power plant in Scriba, N.Y. AP hide caption

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Japan Accident Renews Focus On Spent Fuel In U.S.

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Computer Translator Reads Between The Tweets

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This shipping container was discovered upside down on the seafloor by researchers in June 2004, four months after it was lost at sea. Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute hide caption

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Lost, Then Found: Shipping Containers On Seafloor

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Japanese Players Swing Big In Tokyo Fundraiser

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Gray smoke rises from Unit No. 3 of the stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Monday. Though no country is more familiar with nuclear peril than Japan, many Japanese don't connect the nuclear bombings of World War II with the ongoing crisis at Fukushima, says Yale-trained nuclear physicist Sukeyasu Yamamoto, who teaches in Tokyo. AP hide caption

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Feelings Of 'Accept Pain, Don't Complain' In Japan

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Pressure Builds In Japanese Reactor

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Workers Race To Cool Fuel Rods At Crippled Plant

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Japan's Crippled Nuclear Plant In 'Serious Trouble'

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NPR's Christopher Joyce Reports Tsunami May Have Lessons For U.S.

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A fishing boat lies on its side in shallow water in the boat basin at Crescent City, Calif., after a tsunami surge withdrew March 11. The surges broke loose and damaged most of the 35 boats that remained in the harbor. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

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Tracking A Tsunami Barreling Across The Ocean

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Rising crude oil prices and improved extraction methods have made exploitation of Canada's oil sands more economical. Here, a view of an oil sands mine near Fort McMurray, Alberta. Mark Ralson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Calls Renewed For Friendlier Sources Of Oil

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A production plant on the short of Mellitah, Libya, opened in 2004. Owned by Eni, the Italian oil and gas company, the facility is part of a pipeline that connects Libya to Sicily. Political unrest in the African nation is having effects in the worldwide oil market. Eni Press Office/AP hide caption

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Ripple In Libyan Oil Markets Make Waves Worldwide

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