BP Moves On To Tricky New Fix To Capture Oil
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Icebergs float in a bay off Ammassalik Island, Greenland. John McConnico/AP hide caption

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U.S. Scientists Urge Action On Climate Change
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A worker drives an electric cart past air monitoring equipment in a storage room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M. HO/AP hide caption

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For N.M., Nuclear Waste May Be Too Hot To Handle
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Madagascar is a hot spot of extinctions, and members of the Chamaeleonidae family are currently going extinct. Ignacio De la Riva hide caption

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Lizard Starvation, Extinction Tied To Climate Change
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The U.S. Department of Energy spends $235 million to run the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M. And that investment means jobs. Department of Energy hide caption

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N.M. Salt Beds Could Become Nation's Nuclear Dump
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An offshore oil rig is seen in the Catalina Channel near Long Beach, Calif., in 2008. On Monday, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger withdrew his support for a controversial new offshore oil drilling project off the Santa Barbara coast. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Offshore Drilling Loses Support After Gulf Oil Spill
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Climate Bill Appears Stalled In Senate
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The Birds And The Bees Thrown Off By Early Spring
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Comanche Peak in Glen Rose, Texas, is one of the newer U.S. nuclear power plants. Although construction on the plants began years earlier, its two units became commercially operational in 1990 and 1993, respectively. A new bill pending in Congress will encourage the development of more new plants by partially guaranteeing investors' financial loss. Courtesy of Luminant hide caption

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Government May Support Nuclear Power's Comeback
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The cranium of a creature who lived around 2 millions years ago, and was probably between the ages of 9 and 13 when it died. Scientists say this new species, Australopithecus sediba, may be a direct human ancestor. Brett Eloff/Courtesy of Lee Berger and the University of the Witwatersrand hide caption

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Odd Fossil May Be Human Ancestor, Or Dead End
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Underwater Technology Searches For Missing Flight
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The fossil finger was found in a cave in the Altai Mountains of Siberia. Whoever that finger belonged to was neither human, like us, nor Neanderthal, the only other member of the human line known to be living in Europe at the time. Courtesy of Bence Viola hide caption

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Fossilized Pinky May Point To New Human Relative
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Five fossilized human skulls show how the shape of the early human face evolved: (left to right) Australopithecus africanus, 2.5 million years old; Homo rudolfensis, 1.9 million years old; Homo erectus, 1 million years old; Homo heidelbergensis, 350,000 years old; Homo sapiens, 4,800 years old. Scientists believe that climate change had a major impact on the development of early humans. Chip Clark, Jim DiLoreto, & Don Hurlbert/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Did Climate Change Drive Human Evolution?
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Fire Can Be Good For Global Warming
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African elephants are expected to be at the center of a contentious debate about ivory sales at next week's CITES meeting. Delegates will try to resolve disputes about other animals, including bluefin tuna and hammerhead sharks. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Battle Over Ivory, Tuna Expected At Wildlife Meeting
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