Channel-billed toucans are important seed dispersers in rain forests. Courtesy of Lindolfo Souto/AAAS/Science hide caption

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Big-Mouthed Toucans Key To Forest Evolution

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Colonists built the original glass-blowing kiln in Jamestown, Va., at this beach for easy access to the sand. Now the site is just inches above the water level. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

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The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died. Donald E. Hurlbert/Smithsonian hide caption

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Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

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Doctors at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, treat a boy injured in what the government said was a chemical weapons attack on March 19. Syria's government and rebels accused each other of firing a rocket loaded with chemical agents outside of Aleppo. George Ourfalian/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

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Wind turbines at the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm in Whitewater, Calif., in 2012. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Is The Sky The Limit For Wind Power?

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Thousands of "fairy circles" dot the landscape of the NamibRand Nature Reserve in Namibia. Why these barren circles appear in grassland areas has puzzled scientists for years. N. Juergens/AAAS/Science hide caption

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What's Behind The 'Fairy Circles' That Dot West Africa?

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Jane Goodall Apologizes For Lifted Passages In Her Upcoming Book

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This photo from a Kyodo News helicopter shows a flame of natural gas from a Japanese deep-sea drilling ship on Tuesday. This successful extraction of methane from the seafloor was a world first. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Could Tapping Undersea Methane Lead To A New Gas Boom?

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Scientists say they have put together a record of global temperatures dating back to the end of the last ice age, about 11,000 years ago. This historical artwork of the last ice age was made by Swiss geologist and naturalist Oswald Heer. Oswald Heer/Science Source hide caption

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Past Century's Global Temperature Change Is Fastest On Record

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In this Sept. 1, 2008, photo released by Wildlife Conservation Society, a male forest elephant strides across Langoue Bai, Gabon. Elizabeth M. Rogers/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP hide caption

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Elephant Poaching Pushes Species To Brink Of Extinction

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'Extinction Looms' For Forest Elephants Due To Poaching

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Energy Secretary Nominee Is An Academic, Politico

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American Electric Power's natural gas-burning plant in Dresden, Ohio, is one of the energy company's new investments in alternatives to coal-burning plants. Michael Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Natural Gas Dethrones King Coal As Power Companies Look To Future

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The Boston Tea Party museum sits right on the edge of the harbor. With rising sea levels and the increasing threat of strong storms, buildings like these are at particular risk of flooding. Christopher Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Boston Grapples With The Threat Of Storms And Rising Water

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Plosky Tolbachnik volcano erupts in Russia's Far Eastern Kamchatka Peninsula on Jan. 6, 2013. It's not a so-called "super volcano," but every million years or so scientists say the Earth burps up volcanoes that can erupt for thousands of years. Alexander Petrov/AP hide caption

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Is The Earth Cooking Up Another Super Volcano?

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