New Orleans Imposes Dusk-To-Dawn Curfew

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160293858/160293829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rainfall Tops Levee In Rural Louisiana Parish

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160231131/160231170" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Heath Powers, a project manager at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's "tree torture" lab, climbs through a maze of wiring outside a tree chamber. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

'Torture Lab' Kills Trees To Learn How To Save Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159373972/160062804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

William Armstrong, fire manager for the Santa Fe National Forest service, says lush forests can be a "plague." David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Is It Too Late To Defuse The Danger Of Megafires?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159374096/160012035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Craig Allen, left, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, and Jorge Castro, a visiting professor of ecology from Spain, survey a plateau ravaged during last year's Las Conchas fire in New Mexico. The megafire burned over 150,000 acres of forest. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

In Southwest, Worst-Case Fire Scenario Plays Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159848194/159975459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jorge Castro, a visiting professor of Ecology from Spain, sips water in the shade of a burnt tree in New Mexico's Bandelier Wilderness area. Last year's Las Conchas fire devastated the area burning over 150,000 acres of forest. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Why Forest-Killing Megafires Are The New Normal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159373770/159931382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Smokey the Bear fire prevention sign sits in Valles Caldera along Highway 4, which was one of the front lines in fighting the Las Conchas Fire in 2011. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

How The Smokey Bear Effect Led To Raging Wildfires

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159373691/159902747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Experts say glass buildings kill millions of birds every year. Scientists at Powdermill Avian Research Center are studying ways to help prevent this. Here, a volunteer tags a black hooded warbler in Rector, Pa., in May. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

A Clear And Present Danger: How Glass Kills Birds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157657499/158405664" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Architect Guy Maxwell holds a printout of his proposed design for the new Bridge Building at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Building For Birds: Architects Aim For Safer Skies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157792377/158477176" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cattle use a tree for shade as temperatures rose above 100 degrees in a pasture July 28, 2011, near Canadian, Texas. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images

Are Recent Heat Waves A Result Of Climate Change?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158215252/158232705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for western stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago. Jim Barlow/Science/AAAS hide caption

toggle caption Jim Barlow/Science/AAAS

In Ancient Ore. Dump, Clues To The First Americans?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156685336/156710827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A water tank truck is seen on the main street in Waynesburg, Pa., on April 13. Scientists say naturally polluted water can rise to the surface of the Marcellus Shale; that finding suggests that frack water could seep out, too. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Rising Shale Water Complicates Fracking Debate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156505748/156509773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Man-Made Earthquakes Get Geologists' Attention

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155411570/155411609" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Panel of Hands in the Cave of El Castillo in Spain. New dating methods suggest the paintings could have been drawn by Neanderthals, not humans, as previously thought. Pedro Saura/AAAS/Science hide caption

toggle caption Pedro Saura/AAAS/Science

Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155009945/155082784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript