Christopher Joyce 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Christopher Joyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Christopher Joyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

For several years, Joyce was an editor and correspondent for NPR's Radio Expeditions, a documentary program on natural history and disappearing cultures produced in collaboration with the National Geographic Society that was heard frequently on Morning Edition.

Joyce came to NPR in 1993 as a part-time editor while finishing a book about tropical rainforests and, as he says, "I just fell in love with radio." For two years, Joyce worked on NPR's national desk and was responsible for NPR's Western coverage. But his interest in science and technology soon launched him into parallel work on NPR's science desk.

In addition, Joyce has written two non-fiction books on scientific topics for the popular market: Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with co-author Eric Stover); and Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest.

Before coming to NPR, Joyce worked for ten years as the U.S. correspondent and editor for the British weekly magazine New Scientist.

Joyce's stories on forensic investigations into the massacres in Kosovo and Bosnia were part of NPR's war coverage that won a 1999 Overseas Press Club award. He was part of the Radio Expeditions reporting and editing team that won the 2001 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University journalism award and the 2001 Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Joyce won the 2001 American Association for the Advancement of Science excellence in journalism award.

[+] read more[-] less

Purchase Featured Books

Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest

Purchase Book

Buy Featured Book

Title
Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest
Author
Christopher Joyce

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Witnesses from the Grave : The Stories Bones Tell

Purchase Book

Buy Featured Book

Title
Witnesses from the Grave : The Stories Bones Tell
Author
Christopher Joyce

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

toggle caption Etienne FABRE - SSAC
Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479505786/479561238" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A view from the Shark Valley Visitors Center in Everglades National Park. Much of the freshwater that used to replenish South Florida's saw grass prairie has been diverted to agriculture, researchers say. Pietro Valocchi/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Pietro Valocchi/Flickr
Rising Seas Push Too Much Salt Into The Florida Everglades
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477014085/479420407" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., worries that the continued rise in sea levels could sink the property values of waterfront neighborhoods. PictureWendy/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption PictureWendy/Flickr
Rising Sea Levels Made This Republican Mayor A Climate Change Believer
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477014145/478417245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sauropods were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs to ever walk the Earth. New research helps explain why. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Stocktrek Images/Getty Images
Superhearing And Fast Growth ... Scientists Learn Why Sauropods Ruled
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475597917/475773289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
On Earth Day, Nations To Sign Off On Historic Climate Pact
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475228377/475228378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama met with China's president, Xi Jinping, at an event linked to the international climate conference held late last year outside Paris. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption Evan Vucci/AP
Can The U.S. And China Keep Their Climate Pledges?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474690936/475161659" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People in Boston enjoyed a late winter heat wave this past March. In much of the U.S., climate change is causing winters to warm faster than summers. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images
Climate Change? Some People May Not Be Sweating It Because The Weather Is Nicer
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474690481/475311942" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Large cracks in the sidewalk in Coyle, Okla., appeared after several earthquakes on Jan. 24. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption J Pat Carter/Getty Images
U.S. Geology Maps Reveal Areas Vulnerable To Man-Made Quakes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472232829/472232830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

toggle caption Dave Umberger/AP
To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468045219/468937782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The half-naked hatchetfish, shown here munching on a shrimp, is just one of many billions of mesopelagic ocean fish that migrate up and down the water column each day to hunt food and avoid predators. Wikimedia hide caption

toggle caption Wikimedia
Mysterious Ocean Buzz Traced To Daily Fish Migration
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467428758/467704626" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source
Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466224456/466457156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The totoaba is prized for its large bladder. Richard Herrmann/Minden Pictu via Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Richard Herrmann/Minden Pictu via Corbis
Chinese Taste For Fish Bladder Threatens Tiny Porpoise In Mexico
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466185043/466186372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This San Francisco home collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which also claimed dozens of lives. ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images
U.S. Quake Warning System Could Save Lives When Seconds Count
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465182619/465321689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York City called a travel ban on vehicles in Times Square and elsewhere during last weekend's storm, which broke snowfall records all along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Yana Paskova/Getty Images
A Big El Niño Was The Likely Instigator Of Last Week's Blizzard
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464505488/464603593" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript