Doby Photography /NPR
Christopher Joyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Christopher Joyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

For several years, Joyce was an editor and correspondent for NPR's Radio Expeditions, a documentary program on natural history and disappearing cultures produced in collaboration with the National Geographic Society that was heard frequently on Morning Edition.

Joyce came to NPR in 1993 as a part-time editor while finishing a book about tropical rainforests and, as he says, "I just fell in love with radio." For two years, Joyce worked on NPR's national desk and was responsible for NPR's Western coverage. But his interest in science and technology soon launched him into parallel work on NPR's science desk.

In addition, Joyce has written two non-fiction books on scientific topics for the popular market: Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with co-author Eric Stover); and Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest.

Before coming to NPR, Joyce worked for ten years as the U.S. correspondent and editor for the British weekly magazine New Scientist.

Joyce's stories on forensic investigations into the massacres in Kosovo and Bosnia were part of NPR's war coverage that won a 1999 Overseas Press Club award. He was part of the Radio Expeditions reporting and editing team that won the 2001 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University journalism award and the 2001 Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Joyce won the 2001 American Association for the Advancement of Science excellence in journalism award.

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Story Archive

Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana. However, cutthroat trout populations are threatened by hybridization from mating with rainbow trout. Jonny Armstrong/USGS hide caption

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Jonny Armstrong/USGS

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout

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NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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Some In Corporate America Push Back On Trump's Climate Regulations Roll Back

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Trump's Plan To Ditch Clean Power Plan Threatens Paris Agreement

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

More than 10 wildfires burned over 200,000 acres in Southern California in October 2003, many of them started by humans. This satellite image shows strong winds carrying smoke over the Pacific. MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA hide caption

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MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA

What's The Leading Cause Of Wildfires In The U.S.? Humans

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Atmospheric rivers are sinews of moisture from the tropics. The one pictured here appeared over the Northern Pacific on Jan. 3. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

New Research Shows How 'Atmospheric Rivers' Wreak Havoc Around The Globe

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Tiny, shrimplike amphipods living in the Mariana Trench were contaminated at levels similar to those found in crabs living in waters fed by one of China's most polluted rivers. Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University hide caption

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Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

Pollution Has Worked Its Way Down To The World's Deepest Waters

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Government scientists are working on a climate assessment that among other things will help predict "sunny day" floods like this one in Miami Beach, Fla., in 2015. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Huge Federal Climate Enterprise At Stake As Trump Team Moves In

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Research Finds Evidence Of Coastal Buffer Weakening U.S. Hurricanes

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A natural gas drilling rig's lights shimmer in the evening light near Silt, Colo. Methane is the main component of natural gas, and studies show some methane escapes from leaky oil and gas operations. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Methane's On The Rise, But Regulations To Stop Gas Leaks Still Debated

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Elephant tusks totaling about 15 tons are set on fire during an anti-poaching ceremony at Nairobi National Park in Nairobi, Kenya, in March 2015. Conservationists say a pledge by China to stop the ivory trade is a possible game-changer in the struggle to curb the slaughter of elephants. Khalil Senosi/AP hide caption

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Khalil Senosi/AP

China Says It Will Shut Down Its Ivory Trade in 2017

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