Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.
Doby Photography /NPR
Christopher Joyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Christopher Joyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Christopher Joyce is a correspondent on the science desk at NPR. His stories can be heard on all of NPR's news programs, including NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Joyce seeks out stories in some of the world's most inaccessible places. He has reported from remote villages in the Amazon and Central American rainforests, Tibetan outposts in the mountains of western China, and the bottom of an abandoned copper mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Over the course of his career, Joyce has written stories about volcanoes, hurricanes, human evolution, tagging giant blue-fin tuna, climate change, wars in Kosovo and Iraq and the artificial insemination of an African elephant.

For several years, Joyce was an editor and correspondent for NPR's Radio Expeditions, a documentary program on natural history and disappearing cultures produced in collaboration with the National Geographic Society that was heard frequently on Morning Edition.

Joyce came to NPR in 1993 as a part-time editor while finishing a book about tropical rainforests and, as he says, "I just fell in love with radio." For two years, Joyce worked on NPR's national desk and was responsible for NPR's Western coverage. But his interest in science and technology soon launched him into parallel work on NPR's science desk.

In addition, Joyce has written two non-fiction books on scientific topics for the popular market: Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with co-author Eric Stover); and Earthly Goods: Medicine-Hunting in the Rainforest.

Before coming to NPR, Joyce worked for ten years as the U.S. correspondent and editor for the British weekly magazine New Scientist.

Joyce's stories on forensic investigations into the massacres in Kosovo and Bosnia were part of NPR's war coverage that won a 1999 Overseas Press Club award. He was part of the Radio Expeditions reporting and editing team that won the 2001 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University journalism award and the 2001 Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Joyce won the 2001 American Association for the Advancement of Science excellence in journalism award.

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Story Archive

40 Years Ago, NASA Launched Message To Aliens Into Deep Space

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Scientists Fear Trump Administration Will Counter Climate Report

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Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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Piles of plastic waste are pictured on the seaside in the coastal town of Khalde, south of the Lebanese capital Beirut, on September 22, 2016. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Plastic Is Everywhere And Recycling Isn't The End Of It

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An African cheetah (acinonyx jubatus lanea) at Inverdoorn Game Reservein South Africa. Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images

New Research Suggests Why Mid-Sized Animals Are The Fastest

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Scientists Discover Sneaky Spider That Fools Predators

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Researchers Analyze Economic Impact Of Climate Change In The U.S.

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Potential annual damages are shown on the county-level in a scenario in which emissions of greenhouse gasses continue at current rates. Negative damages indicate economic benefits. Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al./Science hide caption

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Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al./Science

An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

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Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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Morning News Brief: U.S. Pulls Out Of International Climate Accord

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What Are The Ramifications Of The U.S. Leaving The Climate Accord?

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President Trump Decides To Pull U.S. Out Of Paris Climate Agreement

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