Carrie Kahn 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Carrie Kahn 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Carrie Kahn

International Correspondent, Mexico City, Mexico

Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Prior to her post in Mexico Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, most recently covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and has returned to the country six times in the two years since to detail recovery and relief efforts, and the political climate.

Her work included assignments throughout California and the West. In 2010 Kahn was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. She has covered her share of hurricanes since, fire storms and mudslides in Southern California and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for 2 1/2 years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered Northern Mexico, immigration, cross-border issues and the city's ethnic communities.

While at KPBS, Kahn received numerous awards, including back-to-back Sol Price Awards for Responsible Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists. She won the California/Nevada Associated Press award for Best News Feature, eight Golden Mike Awards from the Radio & TV News Association of Southern California and numerous prizes from the San Diego Press Club and the Society of Professional Journalists of San Diego. She was also awarded three consecutive La Pluma Awards from the California Chicano News Media Association.

Prior to joining KPBS, Kahn worked for NPR station KUSP and published a bilingual community newspaper in Santa Cruz, CA.

Kahn is frequently called upon to lecture or discuss border issues and bi-national journalism. Her work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a Bachelors degree from UC Santa Cruz in Biology. For several years she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

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Angelica Rivera, the wife of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, has been embroiled in controversy over the purchase of a luxury home. Thomas Samson/AP hide caption

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Tourists fill the famous La Bodeguita del Medio bar where U.S. author Ernest Hemingway used to drink in Old Havana, Cuba. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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This screen grab of video from a security camera, dated July 11 and released by Mexico's National Security Commission, shows the man Mexican authorities say is Guzman inside his cell at the Altiplano maximum security prison, looking at the shower floor shortly before escaping through a tunnel below. AP hide caption

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Suspected members of El Salvador's 18th Street gang stand handcuffed in pairs at a police station in Panchimalco, near San Salvador. The government has launched well-publicized raids, roundups and a crackdown on gang leaders, locking them away in maximum security prisons. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Panama City's skyline. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Marta Elsie Leveron, 19, (left) and her brother Freddy David Leveron, 18, have not seen their father since he left El Savador to work in California in 1999. A new U.S. program allows families to reunite if one parent is a legal U.S. resident. The girl in the middle is Liliana Beatriz Leveron, 16, a cousin of the other two. Her parents are in the U.S. and she's seeking to reunite with them as well. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Fernando Urias (left) and Victor Manuel Aguirre kiss after they learned they were allowed to marry, during a protest outside the municipal palace in the northern border city of Mexicali, Mexico, on Jan. 17. Alex Cossio/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Cossio/AP