Who Are You, Really? Activists Fight For Pseudonyms
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A supporter holds up a sign as former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks during the Tea Party of America's "Restoring America" event at the Indianola Balloon Festival Grounds in Indianola, Iowa. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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As The 'Un-Candidate,' Palin Tests GOP Patience
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Many parents today expect to have choices — and that includes picking and choosing which vaccines their children gets. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Doctors Counter Vaccine Fears In Pacific Northwest
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Child Pornography Bill Makes Privacy Experts Skittish
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The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy breaks ice to support scientific research in the Arctic Ocean near Barrow, Alaska, in this file photo from July 2006 provided by the Coast Guard. In addition to the medium-class Healy, the U.S. just has two polar-class icebreakers — one of which will be decommissioned soon. Prentice Danner/AP hide caption

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In The Arctic Race, The U.S. Lags Behind
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In this July 27 file photo, Sen. Patty Murray speaks as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid listens at a news conference on Capitol Hill. Reid announced earlier this month he's naming Murray to co-chair a powerful supercommittee charged with finding more than $1 trillion in deficit cuts this fall. J.Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Can Low-Key Sen. Murray Guide Supercommittee?
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Washington Department of Transportation surveyors Mark McDonald (left) and Richard Torres work atop Alaskan Way Viaduct in downtown Seattle in 2009. The viaduct, which was constructed in the 1950s, is slated to be replaced by a deep-bore tunnel. A 2001 earthquake seriously weakened the structure, and engineers say another hard shake could bring it down. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Future Of Shaky Viaduct Divides Seattle Residents
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Lawsuit: Apple, Publishers Colluded On E-Book Prices
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Today, Seattle's Pike Place Market is a bustling tourist spot — where visitors come to buy lattes at the original Starbucks and watch vendors throw fish. But in the late 1970s, the market was a dicier place. And Lowen Clausen — a Seattle cop turned Seattle crime writer — would know. papalars via Flickr hide caption

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A Former Cop Sets His Crime Scene In Seattle
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Preparing For Debt Fallout In The Nation's West
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Two Washington State Women Weigh In On Debt Talks
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The Dalles Dam along the Columbia River, in Dalles, Ore. Five wind power companies asked federal regulators June 13 to stop the region's main transmission utility from shutting them down at night. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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When Water Overpowers, Wind Farms Get Steamed
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Facebook's Newest Challenger: Google Plus
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In central Idaho, local hostility to wolves expresses itself on signs along the highway. Many residents don't like the wolves because the animals kill elk, livestock and pets. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Gray Wolf In Cross Hairs Again After Delisting
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Libyans wait in line at a bank in Benghazi in February. The National Transitional Council in the rebel-held city is continuing to pay government salaries and unemployment stipends. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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If Gadhafi Falls, Could The Rebels Run Libya?
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