Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy, as well as news from the Pacific Northwest.

In addition to general assignment reporting in the U.S., Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota.

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Chicago Police Often Used Excessive Force, DOJ Report Finds

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Newly hired Spokane County Sheriff's Deputy Russell Aldrich chats with strangers in a shopping mall. The exercise is meant to help rookies build up the subtle people skills that older police trainers claim are lacking among many millennial recruits. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In Social Media Age, Young Cops Get Trained For Real-Life Conversation

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Police Officers Fear More For Their Safety, Pew Survey Finds

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At Confirmation Hearing, Sen. Sessions Links Police Morale To Crime Spike

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Police watch activists gather in front of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on July 7, as they march up Fifth Avenue in response to two recent fatal shootings of black men by police. Later, after a peaceful march in Dallas, a sniper targeting police killed five officers and wounded several others before he was killed. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

How The Perceived 'War On Cops' Plays Into Politics And Policing

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A sign marks the border between Canada and the U.S. near Beecher Falls, Vt. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Police And Illegal Immigration: What Our Neighbors Do

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Military-Trained Police May Be Less Hasty To Shoot, But That Got This Vet Fired

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Carmen Spoerer, right, rallies among others protesting against sanctuary cities near the Santa Maria courthouse in Santa Maria, Calif. on Aug. 13. Anne Cusack/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Anne Cusack/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Trump Vows To End 'Sanctuary Cities,' But No One Can Agree What That Label Means

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A member of the New York Police Department stands in front of Trump Tower to provide security to U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Trump's Election Means to Police — And Police Reform

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A new ballot measure in Washington will determine if courts can take away guns from people deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others. The initiative is well-funded and comes two years after the state passed a different initiative for background checks on gun sales, including those that are private. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Gun Control Groups Aim Their Money At States — And The Ballot

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After New York Shooting, Police Say Officials Are Prejudging Cops

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Dejuan Yourse is interviewed by police Officers Charlotte Jackson and Travis Cole in Greensboro, N.C., on June 17. Greensboro Police Department/NPR via YouTube hide caption

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Greensboro Police Department/NPR via YouTube

New Details Emerge On How Police Use Social Media

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Officials inspect the scene at the Seattle homeless camp along Interstate 5 where a car ran off the road and resulted in the death of a young man who was in his tent. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Seattle Swings Between Hounding The Homeless And Leaving Them Alone

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