Martin Kaste i
Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy, as well as news from the Pacific Northwest.

In addition to general assignment reporting in the U.S., Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota.

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Investigators stand next to evidence markers in front of the house of Matthew Stewart, who was shot and injured by Ogden police during a drug raid, in Ogden, Utah, Jan. 5, 2012. One police officer was killed and five were wounded in the shootout that erupted as a narcotics enforcement team executed a search warrant at Stewart's home. George Frey/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption George Frey/Reuters/Landov

Jubin Fallahi enjoys a smoke at the Medina Hookah Lounge in Seattle. There are 11 known hookah lounges in the city, and the mayor wants to shut them all down. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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On Wednesday, Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters announced murder and manslaughter charges against University of Cincinnati police Officer Ray Tensing for the traffic stop shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose. During the press conference, Deters said that "being police officers shouldn't be the role of this university." John Minchillo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption John Minchillo/AP

A cell at New York's Rikers Island jail. About 1,000 people die in American jails every year, and about a third of those are suicides. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Seth Wenig/AP

Inmates at California's Chino State Prison exercise in the prison yard in 2010. A proposition that was passed in the state last year reclassified certain crimes, releasing thousands of inmates earlier than had been anticipated. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Metropolitan Division officers finish another "rollback" operation. They searched the apartment of a paroled armed robber and gang member. These rollbacks are a cornerstone of the Metro Division's strategy of tracking people who may re-offend, and suppressing crime before it happens. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Kaste/NPR