Martin Kaste i
Doby/NPR
Martin Kaste
Doby/NPR

Martin Kaste

Correspondent, National Desk, Seattle

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers law enforcement and privacy, as well as news from the Pacific Northwest.

In addition to general assignment reporting in the U.S., Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Kaste has reported on the government's warrant-less wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that go on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 United States v. Jones ruling concerning GPS tracking.

Before moving to the West Coast, Kaste spent five years as NPR's reporter in South America. He covered the drug wars in Colombia, the financial meltdown in Argentina, the rise of Brazilian president Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, and the fall of Haiti's president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Throughout this assignment, Kaste covered the overthrow of five presidents in five years.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Kaste was a political reporter for Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul for seven years.

Kaste is a graduate of Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota.

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Data Initiative Aims To Help With Police Force Transparency
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The death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 and ensuing confrontations between officers and protesters highlighted a lack of national data on police use of force. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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FBI Director James Comey said this week at Ohio's Kenyon College that "I saw something in the news, so I copied it. I put a piece of tape — I have obviously a laptop, personal laptop — I put a piece of tape over the camera. Because I saw somebody smarter than I am had a piece of tape over their camera." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police
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When It Comes To Police Reform, Insurance Companies May Play A Role
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DOJ Finds A Way To Break Into Terrorist's Locked iPhone
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Authorities search for a suspect following the shooting that killed 14 people on Dec. 2, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif. The public was able to follow the manhunt by listening to police radio communications streaming online. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Police Radio Chatter Is Open To All Ears. But Should It Be?
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Prosecutors Lose Jobs Over Failing To Charge Police Involved In Shootings
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Recent Campaign Events Question Role Of Police At Political Rallies
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From the Apple and FBI dispute in the U.S. to a legal case in Brazil involving the WhatsApp messaging service, U.S. tech companies are finding themselves subject to widely varying laws for cooperating with local police. William Volcov/Brazil Photo Press/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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For U.S. Tech Firms Abroad And Data In The Cloud, Whose Laws Apply?
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Apple-FBI Fight Signals A Need For New Political Precedent
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States Consider Legislation To Shield Law Enforcement Officers
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A U.S. magistrate judge has ordered Apple to help the FBI break into an iPhone used by one of the two shooters in the San Bernardino attack in December. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Slippery Slope? Court Orders Apple To Unlock Shooter's iPhone
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