Doby Photography/NPR
Michele Kelemen 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Michele Kelemen

Correspondent, Diplomacy, Foreign Desk

A former NPR Moscow bureau chief, Michele Kelemen now covers the State Department and Washington's diplomatic corps. Her reports can be heard on all NPR News programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

In her latest beat, Kelemen has been traveling with Secretary of State John Kerry and Hillary Clinton before him, tracking the Obama administration's broad foreign policy agenda from Asia to the Middle East. She also followed President Bush's Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and was part of the NPR team that won the 2007 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of the war in Iraq.

As NPR's Moscow bureau chief, Kelemen chronicled the end of the Yeltsin era and Vladimir Putin's consolidation of power. She recounted the terrible toll of the latest war in Chechnya, while also reporting on a lighter side of Russia, with stories about modern day Russian literature and sports.

Kelemen came to NPR in September 1998, after eight years working for the Voice of America. There, she learned the ropes as a news writer, newscaster and show host.

Michele earned her Bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a Master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Russian and East European Affairs and International Economics.

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Cubans Fear Dampening Of U.S. Relations Under Trump Presidency

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U.N. Human Rights Officials Highlight Signs Of Genocide In South Sudan

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People wait to see President Obama on his way to make a televised address to the Cuban people in Havana on March 22. President Obama's opening to Cuba was carried out largely by executive orders that could be reversed when Donald Trump enters the White House. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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How Trump Could Easily Reverse Obama's Opening To Cuba

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Fidel Castro's Role In Restoring Diplomatic Relations, If Any, Is Up For Debate

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Obama Administration Races To Shore Up Iran Nuclear Deal

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South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley Named As Trump's Ambassador To The U.N.

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Trump Victory Leaves U.N. Officials Hoping To Keep Climate Deal In Place

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Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe left Tokyo Thursday for New York, for talks with Donald Trump. He is the first foreign leader to meet with the president-elect, whose campaign pledges have prompted concerns over U.S. foreign policy. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump In Contact With Foreign Leaders, But State Department Phones Quiet

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Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il toast in Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000. The U.S. and North Korea signed an agreement six years earlier to curb North Korea's nuclear activities in exchange for aid, but it collapsed in 2002, during the Bush administration. Chien-Min Chung/AP hide caption

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Chien-Min Chung/AP

Will Iran Deal Meet The Same Fate As A Past U.S.-North Korean Arms Deal?

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