Peter Kenyon - 2014 i
Stephen Voss/NPR
Peter Kenyon - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Peter Kenyon

International Correspondent, Istanbul, Turkey

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

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Pages bookstore partner and manager Samer al-Kadri (center) talks with customers. The Syrian founded a publishing company in Damascus, but fled when the war made it impossible to run. He wound up in Istanbul, where he noticed a lack of books in Arabic, and took it upon himself to serve the community. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Kenyon/NPR

Demonstrators in the Turkish capital of Ankara hold posters of Ozgecan Aslan, a 20-year-old student who was allegedly killed by a bus driver after fighting off a sexual assault. The posters read: "End killings of women." Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Armenian Christian women pray at St. Giragos Church in southeastern Turkey. The restored church, reopened in 2011, is the largest Armenian church in the Middle East. Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov