Dollar coins gathering dust in the Fed's Baltimore brach. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Planet Money

White House Kills Dollar Coin Program

More than 1 billion coins are sitting unwanted in government vaults. Ending the program will save an estimated $50 million a year.

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Aaron Foster, with cheese. David Kestenbaum/NPR hide caption

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Planet Money

N.Y. Cheese Buyer Hangs On Euro's Fate

Most of the cheese at Murray's Cheese Shop comes from Europe. And the cheese buyer's bonus hinges on the future of the euro.

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Why the long bridge? Stuart Ramson/AP hide caption

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Jane Liaw Liaw orders coins from the U.S. Mint to earn frequent-flier miles. Jane Liaw hide caption

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Planet Money

How Frequent Fliers Exploit A Government Program

Travel enthusiasts buy thousands of coins with credit cards that award frequent-flier miles for purchases. The government picks up the tab for shipping.

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Millions of dollars worth of $1 coins languish in a vault at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond's Baltimore branch. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Jon Gnarr, photographed in 2010. Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Money

The Comedian Who Ran For Mayor

"I just invented a new political party," John Gnarr says. "I was not drunk or anything." He called his party the "Best Party." Because what could be better than the best party?

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