Richard Koenig, 81, defaulted on a $300,000 loan. "I don't have horns," he said. Chana Joffe-Walt/NPR hide caption

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Inside Our Toxic Asset: An 81-Year-Old Man With A Dog Named Muffin

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Medical Billing, A President's Cousin, And The Pain-In-The-Butt Index

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Uncle Sam Needs You To Help Pay Down The Debt

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Planet Money's Toxic Asset Apparently Is Toxic

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For Greece, Breaking The 'Orbital Pull Of Stupid'

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How Do You Rate A Country?

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A merchant in Delhi offers a ledger book used to track pay for government employees. David Kestenbaum/NPR hide caption

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In Search Of India's Red-Tape Factory

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Bribery In India: A Good Thing?

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The collapse of the housing market has turned more than $1 trillion in mortgage-backed bonds into toxic assets. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Toxic Assets Market Awaits Rebound

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A computer monitor confirms the purchase of a toxic asset. (Note: Some information is intentionally blurred out.) David Kestenbaum/NPR hide caption

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We Bought A Toxic Asset; You Can Watch It Die

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