Former South Carolina Republican Rep. Bob Inglis now runs the Energy and Enterprise Initiative. /Energy and Enterprise Initiative hide caption

toggle caption /Energy and Enterprise Initiative
New Groups Make A Conservative Argument On Climate Change
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161824667/161837364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New census figures showing a link between single motherhood and poverty have some analysts touting marriage as a means to curb poverty. But others say it's not so simple. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com
Can Marriage Save Single Mothers From Poverty?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161017580/161050288" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Helping Foster Kids Even After Adoption
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159928096/160155219" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mike Cannata with 2-year-old Bella. Mike and his wife, Barb, brought Bella home from Bulgaria this past spring after spending five years attempting to adopt. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR
Would-Be Parents Wait As Foreign Adoptions Plunge
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157844554/158380906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some young adults say their student loan debt affects their dating and marriage potential. A few have had partners break up with them over debt, while other couples forge ahead, but keep finances separate and avoid legal marriage. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com
Call Me Maybe When Your School Loan Is Paid In Full
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156736915/156869005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roger Williams, memorialized with a statue in Prospect Terrace Park, founded Providence in 1636. According to crime writer Bruce DeSilva, corruption set in not long after. Will Hart via Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Will Hart via Flickr
Big Crime, Little State: Murder, Mystery In R.I.
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156493337/156830032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michelle Holshue racked up $140,000 in student loan debt while training to become a public health nurse. She's living her dream of helping others, she says, but never expected it "to be so hard." Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Bogle/NPR
Buried In Debt, Young People Find Dreams Elusive
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155596354/156034874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brian Tessier, who adopted two children as a single father, with son Ben. Tessier has started a hotline for prospective single dads. Erika Hart/Courtesy of Brian Tessier hide caption

toggle caption Erika Hart/Courtesy of Brian Tessier
Single Dads By Choice: More Men Going It Alone
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/154860588/155337867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Family Equality Council Executive Director Jennifer Chrisler (left), her partner Cheryl Jacques and their sons Tom and Tim Jacques visited Washington on Thursday to ask Congress for equal rights for same-sex families. Sean Carlson/Family Equality Council hide caption

toggle caption Sean Carlson/Family Equality Council
Same-Sex Parents Lobby Congress For Equal Rights
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/152911090/152952439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Graduates of the University of Alabama's class of 2011. The economic downturn has hit recent college grads hard. New data show only half of those who graduated from 2006 to 2011 are working full time. Butch Dill/AP hide caption

toggle caption Butch Dill/AP
College Grads Struggle To Gain Financial Footing
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/152354154/152396909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many working mothers say their employers don't support them when they need to tend to a sick child. In this file photo, a single mother holds her child at a health clinic in Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption John Moore/Getty Images
Working Moms' Challenges: Paid Leave, Child Care
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150967376/150967528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surrogate Whitney Watts had her son, J.P., while her husband, Ray Watts, was at sea with the Navy. Surrogacy experts say it's crucial for surrogates to have their own children because they'd presumably understand the emotions involved in bearing a child. The couple for whom Whitney carried twins paid for all expenses during the pregnancy, including private health insurance. Marisa Peñaloza/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Marisa Peñaloza/NPR
Ties That Bind: When Surrogate Meets Mom-To-Be
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150563803/150586620" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

William Stern holds his daughter, then known as Baby M, in 1987. The Sterns' surrogate tried to keep the baby after she was born. Their court battle became the first public debate about surrogacy. M. Elizabeth Fulford/AP hide caption

toggle caption M. Elizabeth Fulford/AP
Who Is A Parent? Surrogate Technology Outpaces Law
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150586618/150622157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStockphoto.com
Surrogacy Experts Help Navigate Murky Legal Waters
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150498711/150549160" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Professor Hal Hershfield (left), 32, uses a computer program to get an idea of what he might look like at 70 (right). Chinthaka Herath/Courtesy of Hal Hershfield hide caption

toggle caption Chinthaka Herath/Courtesy of Hal Hershfield
Your (Virtual) Future Self Wants You To Save Up
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150424912/150445822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript