Many working mothers say their employers don't support them when they need to tend to a sick child. In this file photo, a single mother holds her child at a health clinic in Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Surrogate Whitney Watts had her son, J.P., while her husband, Ray Watts, was at sea with the Navy. Surrogacy experts say it's crucial for surrogates to have their own children because they'd presumably understand the emotions involved in bearing a child. The couple for whom Whitney carried twins paid for all expenses during the pregnancy, including private health insurance. Marisa Peñaloza/NPR hide caption

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William Stern holds his daughter, then known as Baby M, in 1987. The Sterns' surrogate tried to keep the baby after she was born. Their court battle became the first public debate about surrogacy. M. Elizabeth Fulford/AP hide caption

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Professor Hal Hershfield (left), 32, uses a computer program to get an idea of what he might look like at 70 (right). Chinthaka Herath/Courtesy of Hal Hershfield hide caption

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As the millennial generation enters the workforce, employers report that parents are taking an increasingly active role advocating on behalf of their children. Images Bazaar/Getty Images hide caption

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At Pace University in New York, college students who tutor seniors in local retirement homes are prepped with sensitivity training. Brittany Beckett (left), a Pace student, and Muriel Cohen work together at United Hebrew of New Rochelle. Courtesy of Pace University hide caption

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Kate Donnellon Nail, 43, works out regularly and eats well. She never thought she would have a problem conceiving a child. Anna Kuperberg/www.kuperberg.com hide caption

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Brian Griffith (left), shown here in 2009 at age 26, moved home with his parents, Jay and Jennifer Griffith, after losing his job. The tight job market, especially for college grads, has prompted many young adults to move back in with their parents. Robert Lahser/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney works the crowd as he marches in the Fourth of July parade in Amherst, N.H. Members of Generation X supported GOP candidates by a small margin in 2010. Now they are split between Romney and President Obama. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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To encourage healthy choices, Dow's corporate cafeteria features color-coded utensils. Healthy foods like broccoli, spinach and beets have green handles. Yellow handles mean caution, and red is for temptations like bacon bits and high-fat dressing.

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