John Poole/NPR
Jennifer Ludden - 2014
John Poole/NPR

Jennifer Ludden

Correspondent, National Desk

Jennifer Ludden is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. She covers a range of stories on family life and social issues.

In recent years, Ludden has reported on the changing economics of marriage, the changing role of dads, the impact of rising student debt loads, and the ethical challenges of modern reproductive technology.

Ludden helped cover national security after the 9/11 attacks, then reported on the Bush administration's crackdown on illegal immigrants as well as Congressional efforts to pass a sweeping legalization. She traveled to the Philippines for a story on how an overburdened immigration bureaucracy keeps families separated for years, and to El Salvador to profile migrants who had been deported or turned back at the border.

Prior to moving into her current assignment in 2002, Ludden spent six years as a foreign reporter for NPR covering the Middle East, Europe, and West and Central Africa. She followed the collapse of the decade-long Oslo peace process, shared in two awards (Overseas Press Club and Society of Professional Journalists) for NPR's coverage of the Kosovo war in 1999, and won the Robert F. Kennedy award for her coverage of the overthrow of Mobutu Sese Seko in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

When not navigating war zones, Ludden reported on cultural trends, including the dying tradition of storytellers in Syria, the emergence of Persian pop music in Iran, and the rise of a new form of urban polygamy in Africa.

Before joining NPR in 1995, Ludden reported in Canada, and at public radio stations in Boston and Maine.

Ludden graduated from Syracuse University in 1988 with a bachelor's degree in English and Television, Radio and Film Production.

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Story Archive

Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

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Rick Moore, a dairy farmer in Canton, N.Y., has a solar thermal array to heat water he uses to spray down milking equipment. David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio

As Obama Clean Power Plan Fades, States Craft Strategies To Move Beyond It

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Crowds Eager To Pass Through Security To Witness Trump Inauguration

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Inauguration Day: Peaceful Transition Of Power

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An abortion rights activist holds a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year before the court struck down a Texas law placing restrictions on abortions. Now abortion rights supporters are suing the state again over a new rule. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Lawsuit Challenges Fetal Burial Rule In Texas

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Activist Groups Expect More States To Take Up New Anti-Abortion Measures

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Ohio Gov. Kasich Mulling State Abortion Bans

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Trump Team Asks Energy Dept. Employees About Involvement In Climate Change Work

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Armed Man Threatens D.C. Pizzeria Targeted By Fake News Stories

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Legal Battles Over Abortion Continue In States Across U.S.

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Danny McNeish, his stepmother, Julie, and his father, Phil, on the front porch of Julie and Phil's house in Roanoke, Va. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

This Family Doesn't Agree On Trump — But They Await His Presidency Together

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A health care provider interviews a patient at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Boston in 2013. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Access To Abortion Could Be Curtailed Under Trump Administration

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Poverty Wages For U.S. Child Care Workers May Be Behind High Turnover

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