Julie McCarthy
Wen Wang/N/A

Julie McCarthy

International Correspondent, New Delhi, India

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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Story Archive

Aamir Ame co-wrote the viral hit "Dead Eye," a tribute to Kashmiris whose eyesight was damaged by pellet guns used by security forces to quell demonstrations. He calls it his first "political" song. Syed Shahriyar hide caption

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Syed Shahriyar

A New Generation Of Kashmir Rappers Vents Its Rage In The Valley

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Kashmir Women Risk Their Lives Aiding Militants Against Indian Army

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New Chief Minister For India's Largest State Has Tumultuous First Week

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Seema Parveen, 42, has been divorced by three different men. In India's Muslim community, a husband can divorce his wife by uttering the word "talaq" — Arabic for divorce. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Muslim Women In India Ask Top Court To Ban Instant Divorce

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Salaried employees file their income tax papers at an tax office in New Delhi in 2013. Many Indians, including the entire agricultural sector and those living on less than $3,700 a year, are exempt from income tax. The Finance Ministry says just 27 million Indians paid income tax last year. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Why Do So Few People Pay Income Tax In India?

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Hindu Priest With A History Of Bigotry Selected To Run India's Uttar Pradesh

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Indian Local Election Could Signal Change In Political Landscape

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Millions Head To The Polls In Indian State Elections

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Members of the Indian media watch Rajiv Bansal, then the CFO of Infosys, during the announcement of the company's first quarter results in July 2014 in Bangalore. Indian software services firms draw tens of billions of dollars in revenue from U.S. contracts each year, and that's partly reliant exporting computer science talent on H-1B visas. Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indian IT Outsourcers Anxious Over Potential Changes To H-1B Visas

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People line up to withdraw money from an ATM in Allahabad on Dec. 9. The government's removal of 500- and 1,000-rupee notes from circulation triggered a severe cash shortage. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Can India Teach Us About Abolishing High-Value Currency?

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India Expands Ban On What Politicians May Not Say To Attract Voters

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Actor Aamir Khan plays former wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat, training his on-screen daughters in the art of wrestling, in the film Dangal. Aamir Khan Productions hide caption

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Aamir Khan Productions

Unexpected Heroines Of An Indian Box Office Hit: Female Wrestlers

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