Julie McCarthy
Wen Wang/N/A

Julie McCarthy

International Correspondent, New Delhi, India

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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Jisha's face peers out from posters across the state demanding "Justice for Jisha." Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Brutal Murder In India's Kerala State Spotlights Underlying Maladies

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U.S.-India Relations Centers On Defense, Modi Returns For 4th U.S. Visit

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Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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A farmer steers his cart through land that was a dam brimming with water just a few years ago which fed the district of Beed in the parched state of Maharashtra. After two years of drought it is among India's hardest-hit. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Amid India's Drought Crisis, Suicides Increase Among Farmers Deep In Debt

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Men watch the fires of a cremation along the banks of the Yamuna River against the backdrop of the Wazirabad Barrage and floating industrial waste. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Can India's Sacred But 'Dead' Yamuna River Be Saved?

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Rape Suspects In New Delhi Have A Good Chance Of Being Acquitted, Report Says

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Neetu trains nearly 8 hours a day at a wrestling facility in Rohtak, India. Her coach says, "She doesn't take a break for even one minute." Poulomi Basu/for NPR hide caption

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A Child Bride At 13, She's Turned Herself Into A Prize-Winning Wrestler

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Indian business tycoon Vijay Mallya, the owner of Kingfisher Airlines, gets into his car outside Parliament in New Delhi, India, in 2013. Mallya, who owes large sums on loans to his businesses, recently left the country for Britain, according to reports. Saurabh Das/AP hide caption

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Indian Tycoon Leaves The Country Amid Criminal Investigation

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Traditional Punjabi shoes are displayed at a trade expo in Amritsar, India. The country's new budget will cut the taxes on materials used in heels and soles. Sanjeev Syal/Demotix/Corbis hide caption

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Water In New Dehli Partially Restored After Protesters Sabotage Source

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Protesters from India's Jat agricultural caste block a highway linking New Delhi to Rohtak in the state of Haryana. The government has sent columns of troops to the area. Tsering Topgyal/AP hide caption

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Activists from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) shout slogans during a protest in Mumbai against the Students Union at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on Feb. 15, 2016. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sedition Charge Divides India As Protests Continue

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