Julie McCarthy Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as a international correspondent for NPR. She is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.
Julie McCarthy
Wen Wang/N/A

Julie McCarthy

International Correspondent, New Delhi, India

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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Story Archive

In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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70 Years Later, India And Pakistan Still Feel Impact Of Partition

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107-year-old Mirza Naseem Changezi (left) sits with his son Khalid Changezi, 61, at their home in the Old City of New Delhi. Changezi is reputed to be the Old City's oldest resident and says there was never any question of leaving India for Pakistan. The Changezis trace their roots back 23 generations. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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For India's Oldest Citizens, Independence Day Spurs Memories Of A Painful Partition

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Millions Of Lives Were Changed Immediately With The Partition Of India

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Tensions Escalate Between India And China In Remote Border Area

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Ram Nath Kovind (left) walked with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) and Bharatiya Janata Party senior leader L.K. Advani (center) on their way to file Kovind's nomination papers for the presidential elections in New Delhi on June 23. Kovind belongs to the lowest rank of Hinduism's hierarchy. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

Activists of Swadeshi Jagaran Manch, a Hindu right-wing organization, shout slogans against China during a protest in New Delhi on July 4. They were protesting China's decision to suspend a Hindu pilgrimage to a site in Tibet following tensions between Indian and Chinese troops along the India-China border. Tsering Topgyal/AP hide caption

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Tsering Topgyal/AP

The flotsam of flowers, earthenware, religious idols and clothing left behind by pilgrims clog the banks of the Ganges in Allahabad, India. But the biggest polluter is millions of gallons of untreated sewage discharged into the river. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

Will Giving The Ganges Human Rights Protect The Polluted River?

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Indians Are Nervous And Confused Over Upcoming Tax Changes

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President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi reach to shake hands during their meeting in the Oval Office on Monday. Concerns in New Delhi have centered on whether India will remain a priority relationship for the U.S. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Trump And India's Modi Share Similarities, But A Host Of Issues Divides Them

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Morning News Brief: GOP Health Care Bill, Modi To Visit White House

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Trump Hosts Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi At The White House

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What To Expect With President Trump's First Meeting With Indian Prime Minister Modi

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An employee of Indian IT security solutions company Innefu Labs works at its offices in New Delhi. Newer fields, including artificial intelligence, will require highly advanced skills, analysts say. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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India's Tech Firms Face Fundamental Shift From IT To More Advanced Tech

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Sonata Director Aparna Sen is a veteran of the small, artistic cinema. She says while mainstream films often "commodify" women, "the good news is that many different films are now being made about women" and by women who are starting their own production companies. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Feminist Films Push Boundaries In India

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