Haji Gul Nazim shows how he was able to wash off voter registration ink from his finger. To vote in Afghanistan, each voter presents and identification card and dips his finger in a bottle of indelible ink. If the ink washes off, voters might then be able to vote again -- using bogus identification cards. Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Wildman/NPR

The Santa Fe bridge (shown in February 2010) links the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez (bottom) with the U.S. city of El Paso in Texas. American law enforcement officials say they are worried that violence from newly Sinaloa-controlled areas of Ciudad Juarez will spill over into the U.S. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP

m>Avatar star Sam Worthington returns to the realm of the 3-D blockbuster as Perseus, son of the god Zeus, in Clash of the Titans. It's one of several 3-D pictures currently competing for space on a big screen near you. Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

itoggle caption Warner Bros. Pictures

Archbishop Desmond Tutu is the author of Made for Goodness — written with his daughter Mpho Tutu, also a priest in the Anglican communion — and several other reflections on faith, forgiveness and reconciliation. Cameron Davidson hide caption

itoggle caption Cameron Davidson

Robenson Bernard cries at a hospital in downtown Port-au-Prince on Monday. Bedridden since November, none of the family members that used to take care of him have come since the quake. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Singer Farhad Darya is performing for free to encourage his countrymen to vote in the upcoming presidential election. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Afghans gather at a rally for President Karzai. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Abdul Salam Rocketi was once a commander with the mujahedeen freedom fighters, who distinguished himself with his uncanny ability for firing rocket-propelled grenades. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Ashraf Ghani, pictured in his Kabul home, is among the leading challengers to incumbent President Hamid Karzai. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR